How Did The American Revolution Affect Women's Rights

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THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND WOMEN’S RIGHTS
The American Revolution also known as the Revolution War was fought from 1775 to 1783. Britain had control over 13 American colonies and when conflicts began between the colonies and Britain and the colonies they began fighting for their freedom. The United States finally won its independence from Britain in 1783. The American Revolution affected people’s lives in many ways. This research paper will focus on, “how did the American Revolution affect women’s rights”? What were some of the struggles women faced during this time period, what parts did women play during the revolution and the amazing women whose influence helped achieve equal rights for women.

The American Revolution
The American
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Judith Sargent Murray wrote an essay during this time period in which she titled “The Equality of the sexes”, she argued that whatever equality existed between men and women was because of discrimination and prejudice that prevented women from having the same privileges as men. She claimed that nature demanded equality between both sexes, but because of male domination it tarnished this principle (UShistory.org, 2014).
Women who were strong willed found ways to express their feelings and discontent with the treatment of women. There are amazing women who helped achieve independence. Some of their stories have been underrated kept in some ways in the shadow. Although women were not allowed to participate in the Revolution War they did contribute in their own way at time even risking their own lives.

While their husbands were away serving as soldiers at war, most women attended to the their farms. Other women left with their husbands to war leaving children behind to be raised by family members, while others left with their children to help in the war any way they could. They faced the same fate as soldiers, which included lack of food, shelter and clothing (Murrow,
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Abigail Adams was a women’s rights advocate who through her letters to her husband she encouraged him to “remember the ladies” in the new government (UShistory.org, 2014). The creation of a new form of government was a chance to include women as equal to men.

Mercy Otis Warren was a writer and the first woman playwright. She was opiniated and wrote about the war and political issues. She recognized social differences between men and women and knew that the minds of both could be equally valuable. She pushed the issue of education for girls and women. She worked tirelessly for women’s equal rights (Murrow, 2013).

Margaret Cochran Corbin a soldier’s wife stationed in Fort Washington was a courageous woman. When the British and Hessian troops attacked her husband who was firing the cannon was killed in the line of fire. Margaret wasted no time in mourning; she took over the cannon and continued firing until she severely injured her shoulder, chest and jaw. She was known as Captain Molly (Murrow,

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