Comforting Camp Survivor Of The Holocaust

Superior Essays
Jewish people were who got treated like animals during the Holocaust the most. Some that were in the concentration camps and the time period are still alive today. We can easily notice the personality difference and the face which holds all the stress and grief of this world. Something they have not spoken about, something they need to tell is within their eyes. The fear and confidence in their eyes show us that they are ready to give us anything, ready for many things in the world that most humans are afraid to go through. They are afraid, but they are ready to face this world today. They are humble people who are wise in their decisions. Some have many hopes that were ruined because of the Holocaust. There are so many things need to be said …show more content…
Some have forgiven and forgotten the anger. They became wiser and humble after their experience and have started a new life that gave them the meaning of living and why they survived the scary event called the Holocaust. 170,000 Jews were settled in Israel (where the execution is starting), 4,500 went back to their homes everywhere in Europe, some went to England, and 68,000 settled in the United States legally. I am personally so glad that the Jews were trusted and supported by others throughout the planet. It is so wonderful to know that people care. There are more than 110 Holocaust Survivors and 53 Comforting Camp Survivors today. We need to be thankful for our beautiful environments, many countries in Europe, (South) Korea, and the United States with freedom. The Holocaust was a scary event for many people. Its idea was being used in so many different countries around 1944 and now by North Korea. There is an end to everything and there will be an end to everything if we have people that care for the truth and just things to take place. The Jewish people’s settlement was hard after being treated like nothing and being homeless after their killing center homes. I think many of them have learned valuable lessons from that experience and have adapted to living a new life anywhere. I understand their love for each other and the scariness to go back home where they got hurt the most starting from the ghettos. I want to be like them after their experience, when they knew everything they have been doing was wrong and they needed to humble themselves. I have to be thankful again because of our executed ancestors who live in pride of who they are and who can be a firm witness of important history. Many Jews after Holocaust became something productive and important such as; Professors, authors, artists, actors, directors, musicians, and other. They are talented people who needed to live to

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The nightmares of the past will stay with people wherever they go. But they are given the title “survivors” for a particular reason. They were the ones who endured such a monstrous environment while also encouraging other people to still live through thick and thin. They were the ones who were inputting hope into the Jewish prisoners who didn’t even look toward God for hope and assistance. Once survivors had recovered from witnessing such a horrible make-believe world, they were able to document and publish such a brilliant narrative that would shock humanity forever.…

    • 1455 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They could never forget the horrors they had to face for years. Several of the survivors suffered from night terrors, and severe anxiety. A lot of them chose to block out their pasts entirely, in order to forget the tragedies. Keeping these things bottled up is not productive for the treatment and healing of the survivors. A lot of these liberated Jews are brave enough to share their stories around the world, traveling and teaching young people about the events that happened during the war.…

    • 1417 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Grapes of Wrath is a perfect example of families that are forced to live under struggling circumstances. Such as survival, this realistic story, has inspired many of readers of the book. Thus, opening up their eyes to what they never expected, changing their views of how they see things. Now knowing that all those people back in the 1930s, who were sacrificing everything just to be able to feed one another. Shows how much compassion people had for one another back then.…

    • 1227 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Do you ever become filled with remorse when you do something hurtful to others? Everyone feels it at one point or another. Anne Frank, a Jew hiding in Amsterdam from the Nazis during World War II, believes this to be true. She truly believed that people were still good on the inside when something bad happened. She even stated in her diary, “In spite of everything, I still believe people are really good at heart.” I also believe this to be true.…

    • 829 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The ordeals a person go through could change his or her life in either a positive or a negative way. The life Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor, changed as he encounter the horror of Holocaust and the terror it brought. His memoir, Night, shows how he represented the Jews both in physical and mental form throughout their stay in the concentration camp. Firstly, the change overtime in Elie’s attitude towards God represented more than half of the Jews during the Holocaust. They came in the concentration camps with a strong faith in God; that he would aid them throughout their stay and survive the harsh conditions they had to live with.…

    • 463 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The tradition will continue to live on so long as the majority of the village recognizes the ritual as a tradition. Similarly, this is what happened in Germany and what was developing in America. In Germany, the Nazi Regime scapegoat the Jews. They blamed the Jews for their loss in World War 1 and the bad state of their economy. At first people were reluctant, but eventually the majority of Germans agreed to the scapegoat.…

    • 1458 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Elie Wiesel Effectiveness

    • 1029 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This all went under the governing of Adolf Hitler during the World War II. It shows the power that one’s voice can have in sharing the pain that was caused in our history, all because something was not ideal for one man. One man that corrupted many others into believing his “ways”. Elie goes on to write about the barest means and ways of living they endured throughout their days in camps. Elie Wiesel’s book Night was and still is, highly effective due to the fact it is written about the Holocaust and mass murders that’s…

    • 1029 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This idea between where the victim and perpetrator comes into play is where the gray zone lies. Whilst addressing his experiences within the Auschwitz camp, Levi describes what newcomers to the camp faced. He speaks on the ways in which newcomers were harshly treated (Levi, 37). Many envied newcomers due to the fact that they had more time on the outside and had not been suffering as long as they had. In Levi’s words, “…was envied because he still seemed to have on him the smelll of home”’ (Levi, 39).…

    • 1612 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In my Jewish community, everyone is aware of what massacre has occurred and how detrimental it was to the Jewish religion to try to kill an entire religion based on no moral intel. The thought of the trauma seems to arise itself in the new generations as they grow older and comprehend the magnitude of what happened. So, as generations, past they seem to all develop the same traumatic effects of the holocaust such as their family members because we as an entire community were affected because we lost people in our family to crucial and unhumanized methods. However, we have found a way to cope with the traumatic offense by supporting one another and stick together so that another catastrophic event will be more difficult to take place. there are many Jewish temples around my community that we all know about and confide in one another when we are there.…

    • 1267 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Each theme is necessary to the story because they allow the reader to feel a sense of sadness for Elie and the suffering that he went through. The theme of night teaches us that during the Holocaust death and agony was a normal part of everyday life. The next theme which is faith is the most important because during every chapter we see a proud and faithful boy turn more into the shell of broken nonbeliever. The last theme of the story which is memories is important to the story because without Elie’s hellish memories of the different camps and senses he remembers this book would have never been written the same way. Elie Wisel in the second chapter states “Never shall I forget the flames that consumed my faith forever.” After reading this quote it made me realize the severity of the Holocaust in a much different perspective.…

    • 1480 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays