History Of The Progressive Era

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American reformers think of themselves as progressive, in fact this was the period that became what was known as the progressive era. With the word progressivism we outline a body of social thought that is not entirely coherent to do with dealing with the process of industrialization in the United States. Its not quite socialism or capitalism its stands right in between the two. The Progressive movement is the whole political idea that tries to gather certain facts behind specific policies which falls under progressivism. There are a couple propositions that would have to be kept in mind when you think about the Unites States and the Progressive Era. Life was not very nice for a lot of Americans, especially when you compare to the ideal society …show more content…
Progressives lead by women in front, lead the temperance movement insisting that all alcohol was a morally destructive force, and was the cause of abuse. The efforts coming from the municipal housekeepers lead to the ratification of the 18th amendment in 1919 which had banned the sales or possession of alcohol. The legacies of the progressives and new deal eras are one of shifting social and political values, especially when viewed through the lens of women’s status and opportunity. The progressive era brought women out of the house and onto the national stage, and there organized efforts lead to social reforms and legislative landmarks. This is a prime example of what Charlotte Perkins Gilman was trying to portray in the book “Herland”. Women wanting their independence under any circumstances, but within what they believe is proper for their private families as well as their country and race (Herland, Ch.8). The women were unlike anything the men have ever saw: they were strong and self-confident, intelligent, and more importantly, unafraid of men. These women were also fast like marathon winners, something the men never have never encountered (Herland, Ch.3). This had blended the role for women’s political opinions that had expanded during the Progressive Era. There were many reformers that were middle and upper class women, this meant that the growing economy as well as the expansion of …show more content…
Sports was something that men did to make themselves feel more masculine such as boxing, football and wrestling. Being manly was not only obtained in a physical matter, but mentally as well. Demonstrating the act of respectability and restraint towards others, building character by controlling oneself while sustaining professionalism were examples of mental control. Teddy Roosevelt is an example of someone who is defined as manliness. Everything he did throughout his life was because of his mindset and devotion in keeping his country moving they he wanted it to be. The American culture had embraced masculinity, patriotism, and nationalism and along with these issues, masculinity was playing a predominant role at the time while the women’s movement was at a high. This was the time to for Roosevelt to express his masculine value of the “Strenuous Life”. When Roosevelt talks about the “Strenuous Life,” he is speaking upon the individuals who make the effort in the labor, and creating something rather than having the expectation of it coming to you. Do not be lazy; be successful at what you do. Many examples were used towards the people of Chicago, saying that they do not deserve to live the meaningful lives if you cannot obtain the “Strenuous Life”. Tarzan of the Apes exemplifies both sides of what Roosevelt is portraying, you could be like “Tarzan” and be intellectual, strong, and well-being upon the rest. Being

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