Harlem Dancer Analysis

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Addison Gayle’s main argument is that if Blacks are not angry, then they are not Black, which is seen as de-Americanization. According to the literature from Gayle, “The black artist in the American society who creates without interjecting a note of anger is creating not as a black man, but as an American” (Gayle 1912). The misconception here is how readers view his claim peculiar because Blacks do not always have to be angry to prove that they are Black, as if Gayle is saying that being Black but not angry removes them from blackness. Blacks can be proud and not angry, right? The last thing Whites want to see from the Blacks that is stereotypical is anger because Black people are seen as savages, which is “double consciousness.” But can Blacks …show more content…
The young girl dances at a nightclub, following her dreams to one day become a dancer. As the crowds applaud her for the performance, she believes she is receiving a standing ovation, as a sign that her dream is coming true. Little does she know that she is being viewed as a prostitute dancer, rather than a Harlem dancer. From the poem, “Luxuriant fell; and tossing coins in praise…devoured her shape with eager, passionate gaze” (McKay, The Harlem Dancer (1922)). “Double consciousness” from the selected part of the poem occurs when the girl thinks that she is being praised for doing a wonderful job on stage as a Harlem dancer. However, on the other hand, the Whites are actually praising her because they view her as a prostitute, by the way she dances. It is an oxymoron and a way of the Whites not viewing Blacks for their true value. It is as if Black individuals wished to have gain respect and fame from the Whites, de-Americanization must play a role in it. Otherwise, the more the Black people continue to stick to their own race and perform their talent, the more they are fulfilling the stereotypes by the Whites; making them angry towards the Black men and more lustful or vexed towards the Black …show more content…
Before King is assassinated by a White person, he is seen as “the most dangerous” to America. By 1963, many more young Black people who are inspired to change are taking more interest in the Black Power Movement. Blacks are people that have almost never stopped reattributing justice. So what is the Whites’ fear? White people have been fearful of how they have treated Black people. If they are convinced that Blacks are not real people, then why are the Whites so worried that the Blacks will exercise their humanity by revolting? Black people, however, are not thinking about propelling violence against the White people. They are saying that if the Whites fight them, they will respond with violence. It is like the power of the Black power! And to think that the Blacks want to de-Americanize themselves is almost justice because the narratives of the country for several decades states that to earn all the “alienable” rights, they must be White. Complacency and “double-consciousness” stand in the way of any kind of social change. In some ways, the problem is maybe responding. There is a lot of anger in Black people in America, and, therefore, there are even angrier White people. So if the Whites can exercise their anger in all forms by being outraged by Black men coming home from WW1, for example, how else are the

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