Government And Power In Fahrenheit 451

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Governments and Power Governments need the support of their citizens in order to stay in power. Most of the governments try to sustain their power by doing different kinds of propaganda and manipulating their citizens. Those governments think that they need to have their citizens under control and prevent any dangerous movement that is opposing the government, by various techniques. While a few of the governments use force on the people and are harsh to stay in power, most of the governments subtly convince their citizens by falsely promising welfare to them and furthermore affecting their thoughts in various ways to impose their selfish ideas on them. Governments are affecting their citizens’ thoughts by falsely telling that what the government …show more content…
Books’ existence is forbidden in this dystopian novel, and one of the major reasons for burning the books, as Captain Beatty from the authority explains, is to make people happy. “Colored people don’t like Little Black Sambo. Burn it. White people don’t feel good about Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Burn it… ” (Ray Bradbury, 57). The tyrannical government in Fahrenheit 451, uses the happiness of the society as an excuse to burn the books. It believes that burning books will make everyone happier because there won’t be any books to read and feel sad of. The reason behind the idea of burning books is different, however. The government thinks that if there aren’t any books, which contain dangerous information that can cause people to question and think about their lives and how the government is controlling them, then there won’t be any threat for the authority's power. To achieve this goal, while the the despot government doesn’t let people to read books that contain significant information, it also “Cram[s] them[citizens] full of noncombustible data, chock[s] them so damned full of ‘facts’ they feel stuffed but absolutely ‘brilliant’ with …show more content…
As Emerson Brooking and P. W. Singer, who are political science experts that have graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard, “Social media is indeed a mirror, one that reflects all manner of human interests and ideas, invariably extending into the realm of politics and violence” (Brooking & Singer 74). “But to say that propaganda is inevitable is not to dismiss mass persuasion as harmless” (Sproule 53). In Fahrenheit 451, when the police were chasing Montag, all the action was live on the televisions in every home. When Montag successfully evaded the chase and was finally safe, the government had to cover this up to have the trust and support of the society. When they were “sniffing for a scapegoat to end things with a bang” (Bradbury 141), they suddenly caught “Montag”, the one that they wanted the people to know who was a fugitive and was being chased because of murder and rebellion. “The search is over, Montag is dead; a crime against society has been avenged” (Bradbury 142). By telling this to all citizens of the country, without any exception, the government empowered its support by the people. This made everyone think that the current government was being just, keeping them safe from any possible threat and was a good

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