How Does Globalization Affect Global Trade

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Globalization itself is the result of European expansion. For there to be “Global Trade,” there first has to be a global market. The “Columbian Exchange” came before the Global Trade. The Columbian Exchange is the exchange of people, diseases, domesticated animals and plants, and other cultural knowledge between the peoples of the Old World and the New World.
Now the Global Trade is defined as “economic exchange of goods and other products between the different peoples of the world via established trade networks” and the Global Economy is defined as “integrated global market in which goods and services are bought and sold globally with prices determined by supply and demand.” The Industrial Revolution also played a large role as one of
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If they can’t find people who will work for next to nothing, they’ll abduct people and force them to work for nothing. The slave trade played a big part in creating the global economy and North America, since those peoples had no choice in the matter. As for some of them getting derailed off course and landing on South America, I believe this also greatly affected global trade and the global economy. The Black Caribs, or the Garifuna have a predominantly African ancestry, but also have a high degree of Native American ancestry as well. In the 1600s, a slave ship wrecked on a small island near St. Vincent in the West Indies. The surviving Africans who were Ibibio men from today’s Nigeria, were rescued by the Caribs. They mated with the Carib women and passed on their genes only, carrying out Carib traditions and rituals. They did however follow Native American culture, fishing and hunting and cultivating manioc. The Africans and the Native Americans had increasing problems and thus had conflicts, so the Native American community split from them, occupying the windward side of the island, while the “Red Caribs” leaved on the leeward …show more content…
In 1605, the Dutch established a small settlement and began importing African slaves to work their plantations (sugar and cotton.) The Guianas were never an important region for any sort of plantation crops, so not many European settlers came, nor were there large numbers of African slaves. According to the vignette, most of the Native American peoples died during the seventeenth century because of Old World diseases. The large jungle areas remained lightly inhabited with no interest to the European colonies. As early as the 1620s, escaped slaves would take refuge here and began forming colonies and coastal plantations. The two largest of these groups were the Saramaka and the Djuka. These African communities would raid the coastal plantations and free other slaves to join them. This created problems with the Dutch. The dutch finally formally recognized their independence under the condition that they no longer allow slaves to take refuge with them. Eventually, in 1975, Suriname because an independent country and in 1986, fights broke out between the government troops and the maroon tribes. Eventually the government began logging the tribal areas, and the American Court of Human Rights said they have the same legal status as “indigenous people.” However, the Suriname government has ignored this

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