Genetic Enhancement In Self Control

1248 Words 5 Pages
Since the existence of mankind, people tried to purify humans to create the perfect race. It was a popular movement and gained great popularity during the 20th century but later died down. Animals were bred to benefit specific human needs. A German Shepard, for example, to help shepherds herd their cattle. Also livestock and crops are modified to benefit farmers by generating more profit. With modern technological advancements, people are able to change the gene structure of animals and plants without having the struggle of finding the correct mate for reproduction purposes. However, as the technology advanced, it began to inspire scientist to create this technology available for humans. This raises an ethical question of whether self-direction …show more content…
Michael J. Sandel, an American political philosopher and a professor at Harvard University writes, “The deeper danger is that they represent a kind of hyperagency—a Promethean aspiration to remake nature, including human nature, to serve our purposes and satisfy our desires. The problem is not the drift to mechanism but the drive to mastery. And what the drive to mastery misses and may even destroy is an appreciation of the gifted character of human powers and achievements” (Sandel 54). In this piece of text, Sandel is saying that the main problem with genetic enhancement is that people will try to manipulate their genes in order to obtain a more desireable trait, but while doing so they would change the idea of what it means to be human. The role of nature would be done by humans. No longer would people have to rely on chance to see how their kids would be. Instead they could enhance them to fit into new trends or even become superhuman. Parents would have the power to manipulate their child 's height, memory, sex selection, and the level of athleticism (Sandel). With genetic enhancement parents would try to make their kids everything the parent wasn’t. If the parent wasn’t athletic but wished to be, a gene could be manipulated to allow their child to excel in some sports. Children wouldn’t be seen as a gift anymore. Instead they would be looked at more as a product of the parents creation. A …show more content…
Dov Fox who is a professor at University of San Diego and has written many articles about the implications of progression in science and technology writes, “In 2000, the median household income in the U.S. was $42,148, while the average annual cost of multi-year hGH treatment was $10,000 to $20,000, which is not (as yet) covered by insurance” (79). This statistic is saying that the average American household will not be able to afford the treatment but the rich will. Over time there will be two types of humans. Humans with characteristics and features that they were born with and humans that were enhanced and that are nearly perfect. The enhanced will become more demanded because they obtain the characteristics that are needed for higher positions in a business or in a certain sport. Normal humans would not have the same opportunity just because their parents were not rich enough. Even if the technology does become affordable, it would promote rejection. Fox writes, “But our technological enhancements to body and psyche may also undermine those human goods that are less obvious but more fundamental — especially parental love for the abnormal child and civic love for the abnormal neighbor” (75). In this quote Fox is saying that the technology will erode good human characteristics that are crucial for society. If this technology becomes available to the majority of the society, then most

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