Gender And Violence In The Mabinogi Literary Analysis

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Gloria Steinem once opined, “[a] feminist is anyone who recognizes the equality and full humanity of women and men.” Steinem renovated American journalism through being influential on expressing the improving the treatment of women in workplaces through her involvement in the feminist movements of the late 1960’s and 1970’s. Her domineering emotional strength as an independent female character connects similarity to even other beings. In the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, Pwyll encounters a strong mythological female character by the name of Rhiannon and experiences his cumbersome struggles with her as she acts as an accomplice through the continuous obstacles throughout Pywll’s way. Moreover, despite her presence acting as a mythological …show more content…
In the eBook Gender and Violence in the Mabinogi by Ceridwen Lloyd Morgan, the author suggests the notion of Rhiannon as a strong female character in how she “controls the situation completely at stage, ensuring that Pwyll will play part in her strategam to enable her to reject the husband that was offered to her”. (Morgan 68). Despite Rhiannon’s status as an enchanting being with powers beyond humanity’s capability, she still initiates her decisions and even defies the expectations set up for her through her insistence of a free will-chosen marriage. Despite the initial subservient attitude in how she still seems in need to have a husband, her defiance against conformity of respecting chosen wishes still creates the assertion that she holds her own as a figure. She even dictates her authority over Pwyll and outwardly rejects this unholy alliance with Gwawl as a way to show her desire for something greater. Therefore, she creates that distinction of rejecting societal norms in order to achieve her happiness. However, she still even reflects the characteristics of kindness when she attempts to “mak[e] use of her status to summon the masculine authority of wise teacher and men.”(Morgan 69). Even though she’s renowned for her queen-like status, she still demonstrates the kind …show more content…
Even though Pwyll respects her decisions, he still allows her to be punished when she loses her child and loses her powers, summoning her as “just another woman subservient to masculine power”. (Morgan 69). The ideology of her being a goddess still halts her freedom since she identifies as a woman and after her quarrel of losing her child to the court, she succumbs to the loss of her powerful, radiant self. The idea of accepting her decline of hierarchy embodies the inner struggles of still existing as a woman in societal times of a xenophobic based era. Therefore, such surrender reflects the struggles that even at one point; invincible beings are still susceptible to as a result of gender-affiliated norms. In addition, there seems to still be the notion of how the other world seem to differ in how severe the punishment of humiliating Rhiannon by stripping her powers and subjecting her to ill treatment and disrespect despite the intention behind her actions. Moreover, despite her powers being gone from the initial disappearance of her child, her future son Pryderi still notes on her pleasant appearance through how “even now thou shalt not be ill pleased with her looks”. (Jones & Jones 41). Despite the horrible lash back of her transition into just a beautiful face, she openly illustrates her selfless

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