Summary Of Umm Zakiyyah's If I Should Speak

Improved Essays
This chapter is going to shed light on two distinctive feminist standpoint theorists: Dorothy E. Smith and Patricia Hill Collins. Among other feminist standpoint theorists, the feminist critiques of these two women stand out for me as applicable when analyzing Umm Zakiyyah's trilogy If I Should Speak. The mutuality Smith and Collins have is that they have sought a sociology which takes women's experience as a vantage point where they could see the full picture of society. They are empiricists who experienced marginalization in the patriarchal or racist society whether as housewives or professional and academic women, and of course for Collins as an African-American woman. They composed their theories depending on their own experiences and their case studies. In her thesis entitled …show more content…
Gender roles and relations are not tucked away in those zones called sexuality, the family, interpersonal relations, and the like, which are defined residually by the organization of paid work and the institutions of ruling. Gender is socially constructed in precisely the relations that de Beauvoir first identified as those wherein men could claim to represent at once the masculine and neutral principles. Women were confined to the subjective. The patriarchy of our time has this form. (4)
Smith problematizes the world that women live in. She exposes them to the fact that sexuality has led to gender division. The outcome of this division is the existence of a male dominant and a female dominated. In her book The Everyday World as problematic (1987), Smith has shaped her own sociology. Smith argues that sociology has ignored and objectified women, making them the “Other.” She claims that women’s experiences are fertile grounds for feminist knowledge (O'Brien 807). She offers a new feminist methodology which she builds on two important bases: bifurcation of consciousness and relations of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    She contends a transcendent community is more of an idea than a reality. Chapter 3. Protofeminists and Liberation Limbos: Limbos bring attention to the racial-struggles of black women often ignored by mainstream discourse for current political struggles. James writes, “In their progressive, forward movement, contemporary black feminisms often bend backward toward historical protofeminist ancestors like abolitionist Maria W. Stewart [black self-defense], Ida B. Wells [anti-lynching campaigns], and Ella Baker [sexual and racial exploitation experienced by black female domestic workers].…

    • 1388 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Feminist Social Theory

    • 1600 Words
    • 6 Pages

    When we think of Marxist within the feminist social theory it brings that motion of a struggle towards liberation (Jenness, 1972 p. 18). Mainly on how Marx expresses how every female would be forced to reproduce as ordered (Jenness, 1972 p. 19), Marxism argues how society is fundamentally constructed of the relations people form as they do and make things needed to survive humanly (MacKinnon, 1982 p. 515). Feminist believe that Marxism is male dominated and male defined (MacKinnon, 1982 p. 518) – giving them the understand and notion that analysing society exclusively in class terms ignores the distinctive social experiences of the sexes, obscuring women 's unity (MacKinnon, 1982 p.518). To most feminist’s Marxism is full of ‘bourgeois’ (Ehrlich, 1986 p.5) but to most new socialist feminists have been trying in all manner of inventive ways to come towards a simple understanding another sociologist with an effective thought towards the Feminist Social Theory is Michael…

    • 1600 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    214). Furthermore, she strengthens her argument for the advocacy of women’s ability to be reasonable and rational with her position on how women and men are socialized through education. Perhaps one of her most controversial ideas is that the education of men and women teaches society that women are inferior to men. Specifically, in her publication, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, “her contention is that the lack of intellectual development in women id due to the differences in educational opportunities between the two sexes” (213). It is for these reasons that the adaptation of her male cohorts’ views to her vision of women qualifies her as being avant-garde, or,…

    • 1228 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    feminists) view the oppression of women as part of a larger structure and call for the destruction of the present structure; liberal feminists are trying to find solutions within the existing structure for the gradual realization of reforms, drawing attention to the many different influences that contribute to the inequality between generations. Liberal feminism, socialist feminism and Marxist feminism; we do not come up with obvious approaches like the radical and cultural feminisms. These concepts of feminism have developed theories to remove the problems in the fields such as labor, political-social equality of rights. Because the woman has a position that does not even have the right to vote yet (as Wollstonecraft says) her husband is a prostitute.…

    • 744 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They challenge the biological determinism that said that women are biologically inferior to men and that social and cultural inferiority follow from this. They assert the value of women as women and counter the systematic devaluation of women. Feminist critics have deconstructed the representation of women. The idealized images, stereotypes and archetypes have been studied from the female point of view. It has led to the re-interpretation of literature about women, whether written by men or women.…

    • 711 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    122). As Wijitbusaba (2005) has elucidated, although gender neutrality needs to be further explored in Foucault’s work, the work of Foucault in the Discipline and Punish (1975) and The History of Sexuality (1976) has offered feminists a view of seeing the relationship between sexuality and wider social forces to the traditional functionalism, that creates a ground for a positive area of resistance for divergent groups and individuals (p. 124). Dorothy Smith, a standpoint theorist and feminist sociologist, argues that women have been ignored and objectified in sociology (Siedman, 2008, p. 204). Smith contends that women in sociology are placed in a state of contradiction, called a ‘bifurcation of consciousness’, in relation to their experiences of the world (Bowell, 2010). Smith argues that sociological discourse, has been authorised by men that are based on only men’s lived experiences, not women’s (Siedman, 2008, p. 204).…

    • 742 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Irigaray theorizes that the body’s symbolic meaning structures subjectivity. In Irigaray’s Corporeality, the body becomes an effect and product of symbolism which creates a specific body type only appropriate for society. Therefore, language and culture produce the body. (Notes, 10/6/15). Irigaray stated that “Women’s social inferiority is reinforced and complicated by the fact that woman does not have access to language, except through recourse to ‘masculine’ systems of representation which disappropriate her from her relation to herself and to other women.” (Irigaray, p. 85).…

    • 1456 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    She does not suppose that the concept of "woman" is a well-defined classification. Society constructs subjects and then people come to represent them. Necessities preceded identity. When it reaches to Michel Foucault theory, the "idea" of a woman may make women isolated from their own society, there could be a deeper identity that defines the classification of a "woman." As long as feminism considers…

    • 745 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Simone De Seaviour was a French novelist, social critic and extentialist. She wrote a book called “Second Sex” which explained her reasons for her traditional view on women’s roles. In the “Second Sex” Simone dethroned the “myth of femininity”. The myth of femininity was the false and disempowering idea that women possess a unique and preordained “feminine” essence. Simone believed that condemns women to the role of social and intellectual subordinate to males.…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In Gayle Rubin’s essay, The Traffic in Women: Notes on the “Political Economy” of Sex, she introduces sex gender systems and critiques predominant theoretical models. Rubin explains through each theoretical model how this oppression of women occurs and says that women are treated like objects that can be exchanged. She further explains that men control production and woman control reproduction. Women are considered to produce bodies and are known for labour and men produce commodities. She explains that patriarchy is not something that is escapable, and as a community we need to think of it as a social construct, these are social collaborations.…

    • 1014 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays