Robert Frost's Influence On American Poetry

Superior Essays
Robert Frost is a well-known highly acclaimed poet world-wide. During his lifetime, he obtained more than seventeen honorary degrees from prestigious colleges and universities in the United States and England, and receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for his works. When Frost passed he was the most popular and famous American poet of the century, a cultural icon, and an esteemed literary figure of great influence (Bloom, Bloom 's Major Poets: Robert Frost 14). Frost’s life illustrates the reasoning and logic behind his literary masterpieces, also creating a second meaning when comparing nature with life.
Robert Lee Frost was born in San Francisco on March 26, 1874 and lived there until the age of eleven. After the death of his father in 1885, Frost,
…show more content…
To man, Frost believed, the universe seemed almost chaotic, a confusion in which he could find meaningful patterns of objects and ideas only with difficulty (Potter 156). What he “did” to American poetry was insist that a poem must have a definite form, be dramatic, and use the voice tones to vary the “te tum” effect of traditional iambic meter (Harris 5). The poetic impulse itself is a majority of the confusion before it is shaped into a poem. Although the confusion had a more so negative effect, Frost intelligently took in the pessimistic views and used them as raw materials for his works. When Frost applies his ideas about form to the art of poetry, he shifts his concern with universal chaos to the “wildness” of the creative impulse (Harris 5). A poet should not attempt to place content in a chosen form, rather allow the ideas and thoughts come naturally, a technique Frost exercised …show more content…
and Who will I become? What any poet has to say about man’s status in nature, for example, depends in part upon the landscape and climate he happens to live in and in part upon the reactions to it of his personal temperament (Bloom, Bloom 's Major Poets: Robert Frost 67). Throughout his life, Frost always managed to find his way back to living on a farm in some shape, form, or fashion. A majority of Frost’s works reflect on the scene of nature relating to a personal experience he has one point in life faced. Alike every other human being, Frost confronted himself of his validation to society, but he decided to excel and create his own fate. Early critics may not have agreed with Frost’s form and newly developed techniques, but that did not stop him from accomplishing his

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    He complicates the task more by claiming that poetry must strive to stay away from common language and overused phrases. How can this be achieved while remaining “perspicuous” to the audience? This seemingly contradictory charge reveals the difficulty of writing poetry and creating art. The poet’s job is find balance between the two; a poet must remain understandable while avoiding common language while also conveying ideas in elevated style. Addison conveys this idea by staying that “the judgment of a poet very much discovers itself in shunning the common roads of expression without falling into such ways of speech as may seem stiff and unnatural” (Addison 430).…

    • 1783 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    William Wordsworth once wrote “There neither is, not can be, any essential difference between the language and metrical composition” (147). In his book, “Preface to Lyrical Ballads”, Wordsworth argues for a poetry in which the poet puts an emphasis on emotions, rather than intellect, and on resemblance to common life. He uses these ideas about poetry to claim that prose is essentially no different from poetry. However, many readers might find this idea troublesome; certainly short stories differ from poetry. In this paper, I borrow Wordsworth’s ideas about poetry and explain how William Maxwell’s “Love” can be evaluated as poetry, because it results from Maxwell’s overflow of emotions recollected in tranquility.…

    • 1328 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They allow the speaker to express a theme through various literary elements such as imagery and symbolism. Billy Collins’s “Introduction of Poetry” does an amazing job at using imagery and symbolism, to covey the them of over analyzation of poetry. The imagery and symbolism start off paining a picture of how a poem should be read an analyzed, and as the poem continues it goes into how a poem should not be analyzed. The speaker is telling the reader that to understand a poem and see the true beauty of it, the reader must look at all the wonderful details because that is where the meaning will be. The reader should not just read the poem over and over looking for a meaning.…

    • 803 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Therefore, when reading poetry Collins suggests that meanings can only be revealed over multiple readings with careful interpretation. In the second stanza, a poem is compared to “a hive.” He says we need to “press an ear against its hive.” In this stanza Collins is telling us to listen for the sounds of the poem, and what they convey (danger, excitement, sadness, etc.). The importance of words in poetry is represented by the hive that Collins wants us to press our ear against. Traditionally readers do not think to listen to the words and sound that the words make, but this is exactly what Collins is asking us to do. Another way to experience the poem is to place yourself in the poem and move through it.…

    • 843 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Rosmarie Waldrop is a contemporary poet who seeks to understand the source of art as well as to reform it. She appreciates the paradoxical desires of the writer to break free of long-practiced and redundant structure, yet she understands the human need for order and arrangement. She acknowledges the fact that there is no such thing as an uninfluenced line of poetry; whether the influence is a grammatically and culturally correct form, or an emotional or ideological belief that is shared by poets and authors. According to Waldrop, “Whether we are conscious of it or not, we always write on top of a palimpsest.” (Baker, 75). We have no choice but to be influenced by works of the past.…

    • 1097 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    he broke the rules of structure (syntagm )which contribute to its meaning . by Grice’s maxims this is not suitable but in literature this is an ordinary to make foregrounding because of literature refers to the own imaginary world of author. he used defamiliarisation device (an exaggeration in familiar rules to become artistic). In this poem the poet violated the rules to attract attention on the audience , he makes the text strange , he uses rhyme and rhythm to become artistic , he draws attention to some property of the language itself which is called highlights or foregroundings . In this text cummings breaks the maxims of Grice by using artistic devices in relation to semantic and syntactic rules , as well the level of…

    • 2468 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hegel begins by describing poetry as a form that manifests ideas into concrete actuality, rather than abstract feeling (p. 960). From the inner imagination comes the formation of material in poetry–but this material is not made poetic by being harboured in ideas, but that it is being harboured in an artistic imagination. Here, Hegel defines the artistic imagination as to keep the abstract universality of thought separate from the sensuously concrete objects. Poetry employs language as an external sign of the spiritual, which is, paradoxically, the inner imagination and intuition itself – ‘man’s external world which has essential worth only in relation to man’s inner consciousness’ (p.972). On the subject-matter of a poetic work, Hegel believes…

    • 1070 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    T.S Eliot once said, “Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.” Eliot 's poem, “The Waste Land” (1922), embodies the essence of this quote; take from what is already there, and place his own updated interpretation for the modern audience to provide their own temporal relativist view on top of the already layered meaning of the original work quoted within Eliot 's poem. The historical context around the poem provides deeper insight into the psyche of humanity in general; but most importantly we explore the mind of the poet through these allusions, through the quotes of pre-established Authors and Poets who in their own times were…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Incorporating direct speech into poetry, or straight talk as Pound called it, was also one of their main goals. By turning poetry into a spoken art, common speech became their new unit of rhythm. Trivial, commonplace topics were as valid as precious Greek urns or elusive nightingales. Abstraction was to be avoided at all costs” Harmer mentions that, “The exact word does not mean the word which exactly describes the object in itself, it means the exact word which brings the effect of that object before the reader as it presented itself to the poet’s mind at the time of wiring the poem” (p.46). What is important is to use the word that brings out the effect of the object to the reader.…

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dave Matthews Band

    • 870 Words
    • 4 Pages

    He has been known to sell out Madison Square Garden for multiple show runs, as well as sell out stadiums all over the world. To date, Springsteen has released 18 studio albums, including solo albums and a collaboration with Pete Seeger, and has become one of the top-selling artists of all time. Number Six: Jon Bon Jovi ($300 Million) Jon Bon Jovi is one of the best-selling artists in the world, having released 14 studio albums with Bon Jovi and three solo albums. Among rock singers, he has continued to remain relevant on adult contemporary radio by gaining a new generation of fans with his band’s 2000 album, Crush. Bon Jovi is also a film and television actor, as well as major philanthropist with his own charity, the Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation, which focuses on hunger and homelessness in the United…

    • 870 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays