Frankenstein: Argument Of Nature Or Nurture?

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Are people’s personalities decided at birth by their genetics, or influenced and shaped by the life experiences? Was Frankenstein’s monster inherently evil, or was he driven by the misfortunes he faced? The debate of nature versus nurture is one of the oldest arguments in the history of psychology, and it raises these questions of why we do what we do and how we become the people we are. Nature is the argument that a person’s personality is solely determined by genetics and inherited traits. It’s the belief that who we are is innate and unchangeable. Conversely, those on the side of nurture argue that our personality is influenced by many environmental factors throughout our lives. I believe that ultimately it’s a combination of nature and nurture that leads to the final result of who we are as people.
Traits inherited from parents are usually the easiest to point out. Physical traits, like height, eye color, and skin color, are the most obvious, but personality can also be inherited. I can say with almost certainty that I got my love of reading from my dad, and my stubbornness and
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Nature and genetics provides a basis for personality traits, but experiences and environment are what really shape a person and their personality. This means that everyone is capable of learning and growing, and no one’s life is predetermined at birth. However, it can be hard to figure out exactly where a certain aspect of your personality comes from. For example, what is it that makes me so prone to procrastination? Is there a gene I inherited from one of my parents that drives me to put papers off until the last minute? Or is there something in my life and environment that somehow influenced me to be a procrastinator? These are some of the questions that nature versus nurture tries to answer, and they’re questions that we may never really have answers

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