Florence Kelley: The Progressive Movement

Good Essays
From the 1890’s to the 1920’s, the Progressive Era consisted of many changes in social stances and political methods in the United States. There were numerous individuals who were determined to see reform, including Florence Kelley. Florence Kelley deserves a place in history because she was such an inspirational person who had accomplished giving women and children better rights, especially in the work force. Florence Kelley grew up in a political family which led her to become the person that she was. She had once heard about the abolishment of slavery and the women’s right movement which led her to helping women and children gain the rights that they deserve.
Motivation
Florence Kelley was able to give the women and children the rights that
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Being a part of something so inspiring led to women and children receiving better pay in the jobs they had and shorter work hours. This
FLORENCE KELLEY 4 movement even helped prevent children from working long hours or even working at all. Being involved in this movement helped improve factory conditions to make others’ work lives easier.
The exposure and openness to talk about abolition of slavery, and the women’s rights movement in the United States led to the passing of the nineteenth amendment which guaranteed the rights of women (Carson & Bonk, 1999). Having this type of experience, Kelley felt like she would be able to guarantee a better working world for all working citizens. Without the passing of the nineteenth amendment, women these days would still not have the right to vote. With the help of
Florence Kelley, women now are able to vote and have decreased work hours.
Accomplishments and Contributions
Florence Kelley proves to be well-deserving of a place in history through her
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Florence
Kelley created conditions for legislative abolishment of unregulated child labor and better pay for not only women and children but all citizens (“Florence Kelley,” 2003). This was one of the main achievements that Florence Kelley had accomplished that is still in use today. Florence
Kelley’s many preparations led to her achieving better work hours, wages, and conditions for women and children. Through her research, Florence Kelley published leaflets and persuaded many states to pass laws restricting the number of hours women worked (Baughman, 1998).
Without the influence of Florence Kelley, many women today would still have bad paying jobs with terrible working conditions and long work hours/days. She took the time to gain the information that would convince the states that women’s work hours should be shortened.
Florence kelley introduced the social experiment of minimum wage to the United States in 1909.
She also worked for suffrage and peace over the next decade (Baughman, 1998). With Florence
FLORENCE KELLEY 5
Kelley’s contribution of introducing minimum wage, people of the United States are now able to have equal paying jobs.

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