Analysis Of Do The Right Thing By Spike Lee

Improved Essays
During the late 80’s an innovated film maker named Spike Lee created a revolutionary piece of cinematic history called Do The Right Thing. Lee not only directs this incredible film he also stars as the lead role named “mookie”. Unlike most films in the 80’s Lee exposes the audience to thing they aren’t used to seeing. He uses classical Hollywood cinema techniques to capture his film in a different way. For instance, an individual may notice the use of synchronized sounds, close up shots, and the camera being at eye level or angled. These are all techniques Lee used to expose his audience to a different type of film making while focusing on what race means in contemporary America.
One of the most important techniques Lee uses is the amount
…show more content…
Radio Raheem views fighting the power as a fight for equality. However, his good intensions are misled by the violent society around him. According to an online source, “Do the Right Thing and 'Fight the Power ' became rallying cries for a generation of post-civil-rights-era black Americans, who were not only speaking truth to power, but speaking back to blackness. And historically, it was an important moment.” By surrounding the movie around ‘Fight The Power’ the song became a statement rather than being background music. Using sounds in films is essential because it’s the most important sense that invokes the memory of the audience thus becoming essential. Another thing to note is the jazz instrumentals played throughout the movie during sad …show more content…
This can be seen when the different races speak straight into the camera about they hate other races. It can also be seen when Lee himself looks into the camera and says, “You’re all racists”. Lee also uses different lighting to expose the extreme heat that the characters are faced with.
Overall, Lee produced his film by exploiting pre and post classical Hollywood cinema techniques by using music and facing the camera on the characters in different angles and using close up shots. Having strong visuals is important but the audience gains a lager experience due to then musical components. “Fight The Power” exemplified the racial tensions in the neighborhood. The song became a clear sign of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    My favorite film is Remember the Titans. The film is about a football team and their struggles with integrating an African American high school and a Caucasian high school. Taking place in Virginia in 1971, the film shows the racial tension of the community using techniques to make it cinematic. One of the ways that allows the viewer to understand the tension in the movie is with camera angles.…

    • 506 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hollywood films featuring lead black characters have been in cinema for decades. In contrast, black character images that are portrayed in cinema was usually centered around traditional racial stereotypes of the past such as “Uncle Tom, “the coon”, “the brutal black buck”, and “the mammy”. In today’s contemporary films, the black protagonist is often represented as having super natural or magical powers. As a result of this portrayal, a new racial stereotype was created; the “magical negro” that which reinvents the traditional stereotypes aforementioned. One film that represents the “magical negro” trope is Frank Darabont’s 1999 film, The Green Mile.…

    • 977 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If I were to tell you to watch a film about men in prison, what would you think? most people would think it’s another ordinary Hollywood flick. The film “The Shawshank Redemption” based on the novella “Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption” succeeds in avoiding the familiar and it manages to redeem Hollywood in the eyes of people who feared it in a dark ocean full of predictability and clichés. With music, visuals, script and acting, the director of this film Frank Darabont has proved himself the master of the craft to create one of the most recognisable films. For those unaware, The Shawshank Redemption is about a man named Andy Dufresne (Tim Robbins) who is wrongly convicted of murder and is sentenced to two consecutive life terms…

    • 177 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Spike Lee, born Shelton Jackson Lee, is an African American producer, director, writer and actor (biography.com, 2015). He has produced projects that focus on racial tension, political issues, crime in urban societies and violence. This paper will not only focus and showcase Lee’s mastery, but it will also show how his journey correlates to certain sections of the course’s text in regards to his creative task, creative mind and his breakthrough. How Lee had to overcome emotional pitfalls and how it helped make him the master that he is today. This paper will also touch on how Spike Lee and Martha Graham relate in their Mastery journey.…

    • 986 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the essay, “The Offensive Movie Cliche’ That Won’t Die”, the author, Matt Zoller Seitz argues that most films portraying good morals and positive attributes about an African American character may actually just be an illusion to the audience and that the strings controlling the puppet aren’t so friendly after all. He also mentions how the role of a “magical negro” shows up in real life. Throughout his text, Seitz exemplifies a number of cases where a “magical negro” exists in today’s popular movies. He mentions various instances where some of the most relevant actors play these roles of the “magical negro”, such as Danny Glover in Legendary, Cuba Gooding Jr. in What Dreams May Come, Will Smith in The Legend of Bagger Vance, Laurence Fishburne…

    • 552 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    But now it is necessary to ask “how?” How did Spike Lee manage to tackle such controversial issues and invoke such intriguing conversations while remaining strong within his vision, a vision he wanted to be as realistic and genuine as…

    • 3314 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    The era of hostile racial prejudice, the periods of slavery and racial segregation is an era that has extensively found itself in reluctant conversations across cultures, the effects continuing to radiate from the 19th century, the epicentre of racism. An uncomfortable truth to confront, race as a socio-political concept is a topic we refuse to divulge in or if done so, is a conversation peppered with scientific evidence that is nothing but discriminatory. Significant public figures have dismissed the presence of racial discrimination in the 21st century, the famous misnomer “America doesn’t have a race problem” equalised to Malcom X’s powerful legend, “You get your freedom by letting your enemy know that you'll do anything to get it.” Yet,…

    • 1896 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Craig Werner’s A Change is Gonna Come: Music, Race, and the Soul of America, serves as an overview of the post-war history of recorded music by and influenced by African Americans. In addition to a historical analysis of post-war African American music, Werner focuses on how music both effects and is effected by society and provides a running dialogue between artists and eras. Music’s significance transcends its commercial and aesthetic value and does not simply serve as a soundtrack to a generation or a point in time. Additionally, music weaves itself into the fabric of history and when viewed in isolation loses its context and importance in understanding how it and the surrounding world changed over time. With that in mind, Werner sets out to place popular and vernacular artists in the “African American idiom” as a vital mirror to the human and American experience and in possession of the capacity to effect change.…

    • 1018 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Essay On Spike Lee

    • 557 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Spike Lee films are usually set in urban areas of big cities that have a high amount of African American kids. Spike Lee has a lot of different pre and post classical Hollywood cinema techniques that he uses. He has a new way of thinking and all of his movies stand out because of his brilliant way of thinking. Spike Lee grew up watching early Hollywood techniques like synchronized sound, this makes him very unique because he uses different types of angles such as eye level camera angles, a lot of close up shots, and seamless cuts throughout all of his films. Spike Lee uses cities with a large amount of African American youth because he likes to show that African Americans males are misunderstood and targeted most of the time.…

    • 557 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Spike Lee combines certain cinematic techniques together in order to convey a specific message about societal issues such as race and gender. Throughout this analysis of Spike Lee, the relationship between the dialogue in a sequence and the cinematic techniques in a sequence will be heavily analyzed. The analysis of this relationship will help the viewer to understand the message that Spike Lee is trying to convey in his films. To reinforce this relationship, the ideas of the film theorist Vsevolod Pudovkin are helpful in understanding why Spike Lee chose to place certain shots in a specific order.…

    • 1250 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ozekia Wilder Professor Andre ENGL 1102 30 March 2018 Abstract Spike Lee’s film Do the Right Thing imparts a day in a racially mixed neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. In the film Spike Lee demonstrates the different behaviors and cultures amongst the different races in the neighborhood. The film centers on how social class, race and the decisions that the characters make have a direct effect on the way people interact with each other. I argue that the way a group of people act or the things they do within their culture causes them to be stereotyped.…

    • 247 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Harper lee demonstrates her view of 1930s alabama through three main points: gender, race and education, when exploring each individual point lee uses characters with 2 dimensional personalities (the exceptions being Scout, Mayella Ewell, Aunt Alexandra and The Cunninghams), lee's characters fit into one archetype from each of the following character archetype pairs (black/white, rich/poor, kind/nasty, educated/illiterate), at each the introduction of a character lee establish's them as either a"good guy" or a "bad guy". When exploring race, Lee uses characters who share traits such as being educated, kind, illiterate or mean but differ in their race. This helps Lee demonstrate how being black classed someone as the lowest kind of folk on…

    • 558 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Walter's Thing Analysis

    • 367 Words
    • 2 Pages

    "Walter's Thing: The NAACP's Hollywood Bureau of 1946--A Cautionary Tale" The author’s main argument in this article is that the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is a better agency than the previous Hollywood agency whereas every institutional foundation made attempts to deny African American life and culture when on the scenes. The new agency made it fair in that the African American’s are not denied the opportunity of playing their roles in movie making. The author gives sufficient amount of support for this argument throughout this article.…

    • 367 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The golden legacy of Hollywood birthed such a strong approach to narrative and visual storytelling that it went on to become one of the most dominant styles of filmmaking worldwide. Hollywood’s foundation, however, was contaminated with a strain of racism from the beginning with one of its initial major films, D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation. With the discriminatory portrayal of African Americans, this Hollywood product would become a significant influence of discussion and mindset for films, and audiences alike, for years to come. The new film, The Birth of a Nation(2016) by Nate Parker, and the portrayal of the Nat Turner rebellion seems to be the latest in a long line of films endeavoring to correct the legacy of racist black American portrayals in Hollywood films that originated from the 1915 film of the same name. In regards to the racist legacy of the 1915…

    • 1410 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Get Busy Living Or Get Busy Dying: A Film Analysis on Shawshank Redemption According to Red life is pretty simple: “I guess it comes down to a simple choice, really. Get busy living or get busy dying.” Shawshank Redemption written by Stephen King and directed by Frank Darabont is a moving story about an innocent man in prison.…

    • 1025 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays