Analysis Of Do The Right Thing By Spike Lee

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During the late 80’s an innovated film maker named Spike Lee created a revolutionary piece of cinematic history called Do The Right Thing. Lee not only directs this incredible film he also stars as the lead role named “mookie”. Unlike most films in the 80’s Lee exposes the audience to thing they aren’t used to seeing. He uses classical Hollywood cinema techniques to capture his film in a different way. For instance, an individual may notice the use of synchronized sounds, close up shots, and the camera being at eye level or angled. These are all techniques Lee used to expose his audience to a different type of film making while focusing on what race means in contemporary America.
One of the most important techniques Lee uses is the amount
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Radio Raheem views fighting the power as a fight for equality. However, his good intensions are misled by the violent society around him. According to an online source, “Do the Right Thing and 'Fight the Power ' became rallying cries for a generation of post-civil-rights-era black Americans, who were not only speaking truth to power, but speaking back to blackness. And historically, it was an important moment.” By surrounding the movie around ‘Fight The Power’ the song became a statement rather than being background music. Using sounds in films is essential because it’s the most important sense that invokes the memory of the audience thus becoming essential. Another thing to note is the jazz instrumentals played throughout the movie during sad …show more content…
This can be seen when the different races speak straight into the camera about they hate other races. It can also be seen when Lee himself looks into the camera and says, “You’re all racists”. Lee also uses different lighting to expose the extreme heat that the characters are faced with.
Overall, Lee produced his film by exploiting pre and post classical Hollywood cinema techniques by using music and facing the camera on the characters in different angles and using close up shots. Having strong visuals is important but the audience gains a lager experience due to then musical components. “Fight The Power” exemplified the racial tensions in the neighborhood. The song became a clear sign of

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