The Feminist Theory: The Indigenous Women Of Canada

Great Essays
Canadian women were first given the right to vote in the year 1916. This achievement was limited to only the females of the province of Manitoba. Although the right for a woman to vote was limited to Manitoba, the suffragettes had achieved something that few females had achieved before. The achievement of these Manitoba women casting down the social norm of only men having the right to vote was just the beginning of this social movement. Two years later in 1918, the Federal authorities granted women the franchise of the right to vote (Historica Canada, Para. 1). The last of the women of Canada to achieve their rights were the women of Quebec and the indigenous women of Canada. The women of Quebec achieved their provincial rights in the year …show more content…
The feminist theory is the “conflict theory that studies gender, patriarchy, and the oppression of women” (Boundless, para.1). Feminist theory can be expanded into three different categories, these categories being:
The first wave focused on suffrage and political rights. The second focused on social inequality between genders. The current, third wave emphasizes the concepts of globalization, post-colonialism, post-structuralism, and postmodernism. (Boundless, para. 2)
All three of the feminist perspective are focused around the rights of women that still apply today and throughout different parts of times. The first wave analyzes the suffragettes, women who fight for their rights to vote and have an impact in both federal and provincial politics. The second wave focuses on gender inequality, which is still present in a majority of the world. The final wave focuses on equality on a more diverse scale. All three of the waves are still significant to this day. A county such as Canada, have given the right to vote to women but other, more diverse countries have yet to make this transitions due to laws and traditions. Feminist theorists believe that women have been “systematically oppressed and that men have been historically dominant” (Boundless, para.1). Through the use of feminist theory, the wage inequality and furthermore, all female inequality is due to the traditional means of male dominance
…show more content…
Before women had the rights that they have today, they lived in a functionalist society in which they were supressed and reduced to caregivers of a man’s property and family. Their suppression was expected and was regarded as a social norm, a norm that they believed kept society as a thriving whole. As the times continued and the rights for females were fought for, people of power and traditional upbringing were threatened by these females and opposed their movements for equality. The ways of the past can still be seen to this day. Females are faced with wage differences, gender oppression, gender specific ideals and even aggression even to this day. The feminist conflict theory focuses on these inequalities and the tradition of male domination to bring awareness towards the oppression of women. Through the availability of a growing media, gender inequality is becoming more known and people are learning the sociological explanations such as the functional perspective that are holding back women. In a world that is moving toward gender equality, the old way of functionalism much adapt to the now growing increase of gender

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