Women's Suffrage In Canada Research Paper

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Women’s Suffrage Essay Draft 1 – March 30, 2016 (Word count: 1338)

Women in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta were the first to gain a vote in Canada. The fight for women’s suffrage was a continuous momentum that was felt not only in Canada but also around the world, including in countries such as Great Britain and the United States. The suffrage movements in other countries influenced the women in Canada to fight for a vote as well. Three major factors that helped Canadian women succeed in their campaign to achieve the vote was that they had the support from many influential groups and people, they had a continuously growing voice, and they proved their competence through their service and sacrifice during the First World War. Proven by
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Groups such as the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), the Canadian Women’s Suffrage Association, and the National Council of Women supported the suffragettes. Many of the leaders within these groups were educated and professional women who spoke up for middle-class women who were also interested in votes for women. The Grain Growers’ Association was also another influential group who supported woman’s suffrage. Since they were engaged in agricultural labour, there were well respected by the men in the Prairies. They were a group who embraced woman’s suffrage and responded greatly to the plight of rural women. The Grain Grower’s Association published a newspaper called The Grain Growers’ Guide and allowed suffragettes to publish in the paper for their cause. Furthermore, women were not the only ones who published about the campaign in The Grain Growers’ Guide. Men who supported the movement also made compelling arguments as to why women should have a vote. The following is an excerpt from an article written by F. J. Dixon in the Grain Growers’ …show more content…
The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) was one of the main temperance organizations. The leaders of the WCTU saw votes for women as a necessary addition to achieve prohibition. Moreover, temperance movements proved to be successful in other countries where women had the vote. Advertisements for women’s suffrage were common, many saying “…[places] where women have had the ballot for three years, has just secured a sweeping victory for total prohibition.” [2] Additionally, political motives often benefitted the campaign for women’s suffrage. The Wartime Elections Act that was introduced by Robert Borden provided many women with the vote for the first time. The Act was designed to give the vote to people who would be in favour of conscription and take the vote away from people who would likely be against it. It granted the vote to wives, mothers and sisters of serving soldiers, as well as women serving in the military. Conclusively, the Act successfully gained support for Borden’s Unionists Party. The women’s suffrage campaign was also supported by Sir John A. Macdonald, who introduced many bills in favour of women’s suffrage in parliament. Support from influential groups, the temperance campaign, and important politicians aided the suffragists significantly in their movement for women’s

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