Essay Summary: Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee

Improved Essays
Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee tells the story of the indians and their struggles against the United States. The novel tells several different stories of chiefs and their tribes and how they all fought for their land against the United States Government. The story describes famous battles like Little Crow’s war and the Battle at Wounded Knee. It also shows the indians efforts to stay on there land to the point they have to go to war with the American Government. Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee describes the challenges faced by the Native Americans from the United States Government, land hungry settlers, and the destruction of the buffalo.
In chapter three Little Crow’s War the Sioux Chief trades his land to the American’s in exchange for rations.
…show more content…
Black Kettle Signs a treaty to stay within Sand Creek and Arkansas River. In exchange the Americans would leave them alone. This treaty is broken when Union Army soldiers chase Confederate soldiers through the indian land. After three small gunfights Black Kettle tries to make peace. The Americans and the Indians do not come to an agreement and the Americans attacked the Cheyenne at Sand Creek. The army massacres the indians killing 133. The survivors move south in order to find more buffalo losing their land …show more content…
The Indians moved into American towns and were given some land, but the majority of the land had been over hunted resulting in short food supply, and putting the Buffalo on the verge of extinction. The chief Big Foot is one of the last leaders of an indian tribe. He and his group are captured and forced to move to a reservation at Wounded Knee. Shortly after this the American’s surround their camp with men and canons. The American’s tell the Indians they have to give up their weapons which is one of the only things they have left. The Indians gave up their weapons except for one who had a rifle in his hand. This Indian was named Black Coyote and he was death and could not hear the American’s commands. A American soldier decides to forcefully take the weapon and a shot goes off resulting in battle. The Indians either engaged the soldiers in battle or tried to run. Those who ran were hit by canons or were shot down. The Americans didn’t care if it was a man, woman, or child. The estimated death count was three-hundred men, women, and children out of three-hundred and

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Essay On Black Hawk War

    • 1032 Words
    • 5 Pages

    THE BLACK HAWK WAR? OR THE WAR FOR CHICAGO The Black Hawk War was one of the most vital parts of Chicago history. Chicago would not have happened if not for the Black Hawk war. Chicago was formed after the events of the Black Hawk War.…

    • 1032 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Andrew Jackson was a very controversial President. There are multiple positives and negatives to Andrew Jackson. Andrew is America’s great worst President. I am going to discuss and tell you if you he was a good or bad President is his term from March 4, 1829- March 4, 1837. Before Andrew Jackson was President, he had nine slaves.…

    • 2021 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the book, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, author Dee Brown argues that the Native American’s historical injustices and oppressions should be remembered in the attempt to prevent similar events from happening in the future. He supports his argument through the voices of different tribes and army men as he describes battles, broken treaties and massacres. In this way he illustrates how the racism against Indians in many people, including army officials, causes great tension throughout many conflicts. Brown demonstrates this attitude while he argues that soldiers ignored the Indians desire for peace. Through countless events he argues, that because of the white man’s hunger for land, the Indians were tricked and forced, one tribe after another, onto…

    • 1174 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    For many years in the newly developing America, there was a lot of debate about what to do with the so called “Indian problem”. Americans sought out various ways to remove the Indian population from lands in the east and eventually the west too as they continued to expand. There were four primary ideas that were proposed: to exterminate the Indian population, to assimilate them into American culture, to protect them on their ancestral lands (which just wasn’t likely to happen), or to move them to distant lands (which was seen as the Christian and humane thing to do). With these concepts in mind, congress passed the Indian Removal Act in 1830 under the presidency of Andrew Jackson. This act was to then be carried out by Jackson negotiating…

    • 1004 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Since most of the Native Americans stayed within the time frame Andrew Jackson gave them to leave in, they were forcibly removed at gun point and were not allowed to collect their belongings. Instead, the white men pillaged their villages and took everything the Cherokees had, “Some of the Cherokee left almost naked and without shoes or only in moccasins and refused government clothing because they felt it would be taken as an acceptance of being removed from their homes.” Since the Native Americans are uprooted of everything they have, they decide to comply and head westward. The journey starts in blazing hot summer, with temperatures of 100 degrees or more on a daily basis. The journey takes several months, and those several months are not an easy task.…

    • 1424 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Choctaw Indians Case Study

    • 1771 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Indian (d) a) Although many Choctaw Indians did resist the removal, it was a quieter one than the others. b) After the Treaty of Fort Laramie (also called the Sioux Treaty of 1868,) the Sioux were granted the ownership of the Black Hills and hunting rights to various parts of South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming. However, when gold was discovered in the Black Hills, gold prospectors began to violate the treaty, leading to the Black Hills War. When the U.S. government seized the Black Hills and offered the Sioux money for the land, they refused the money and demanded the land back.…

    • 1771 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The interviews allow the reader to “obtain an Indian understanding of the treaty and of the promises made to the Indians by the government” (Smith, 47). Almost a century later people are finally becoming more open-minded and are trying to educate themselves by learning historical events from a different perspective and from different sources. The interviews highlight the loss of traditional way of life and eventual dependence on the federal government because according to Mrs. Buffalo, “[t]he white people just took away all the buffalo… [and] the white men gave us cow to eat” (48). This shows cultural assimilation and demonstrates how Indigenous lives were dramatically altered and how they were disrespected. Smith and McLeod both use additional sources to show the treaties affected people differently, how modern accounts reinforces the importance of listening to Indigenous people to fully comprehend past events and acknowledges and the importance of acknowledging that there are biases in written texts and that oral accounts need to be examined…

    • 1061 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Ghost Dance History

    • 1268 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Savanna Taylor Ms. Teichman English 101 (15) 19 September 2016 ‘The Ghost Dance’ It is true to say that different communities in the world became rebellious to the European civilization especially on religious matters. In this case, also the Indians in Western America had to have a rebellious cult that would enlighten their struggle from the hands of the European invader. The Indians of America and mostly from Western Great Basin hence began a cult that was known as ‘the ghost dance’ or Natdia in native America (Weiser). The ghost dance emerged in the 1870s and was purposely brought about to unite the Indians and enable them rebel against the Indian reservations.…

    • 1268 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Imagine fighting for a great cause, not only for your country but for your own race! African Americans fought for both the Confederates and the Union. Some of these African Americans were former slaves, others were African Americans who wanted to abolish (or get rid of) slavery. Over 180,000 African Americans served in the Civil War. Many however, were not recognized after the war ended.…

    • 1654 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Gary C. Anderson wrote the biography Sitting Bull and the Paradox of Lakota Nationhood in an effort to tell the story, from Sitting Bull’s perspective, of how the Lakota nationhood were committed to defend their land as well as examine the goals and purposes of the American culture to dominate upon them. Despite the factionalisms, encouraged by the federal government, in the Lakota that led to the division of the nationhood, Sitting Bull is considered one of the most significant and influential Native Americans in history because he would always look out for the best interest of the Sioux tribe and the Lakota nation by standing up against the American army who was interested in the relocation of Indians and the creation of reservations. It…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    War Of 1812 Consequences

    • 1600 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The journey depicted the brutal action that the government underwent to remove the Cherokee out of their land. Around 4,000 Cherokee Natives died and showed the brutal actions that the United States took to strip the Natives of the ancestral land (Stockdale 2). The natives were seen as being uncivilized beings who were known as just being “hunters” or “savages” although they were able to prove otherwise by creating their own indigenous language and culture with neighboring Natives near the Mississippi River (“Indian Removal Act 1830” 1). The Removal Act promised to secure the lives of Native Americans, but further caused many to undergo an arduous journey to Oklahoma, stripping them of their ancestral land and causing them to lose many of their people. The Natives fought back with their attempts to stop westward expansion and ultimately showed their devastation as a race by their countless efforts of fighting back the land and people they lost (Stockdale…

    • 1600 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Trail Of Tears Effects

    • 2020 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The effects of the Trail of Tears When we think of the first people in America, whom do we think of? Of course, Christopher Columbus comes to mind. Yet, the first people on land were the native people. Native people were the first people to set foot on this soil, long before any white person. Regrettably, the federal government brutally attacked and removed from the Indians from homelands that they dearly loved.…

    • 2020 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Multiple forms of hatred and disregard for human lives plague the beginning of this country. Throughout taking this course, my eyes have been opened up to how terrible our nation really is; we threw the indians out of their homes, segregated and belittled anyone different, monopolized industries, treated women with utter disrespect and inequality, and treated workers, in general, as if they were not humans. They say America is the land of the free and opportunity, but is it really? When America was first colonized, the people immigrating to the colonies deemed themselves the rulers of the “new” land.…

    • 548 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ever since descendants of Americans came to America we have always had conflicts with the Native Americans also known as the indians. Either it be a war between the two different races or just fighting over irrelevant things. One of the unforgettable events with Americans and the Native Americans was the Trail of Tears which involves the Cherokee nation. When the Americans moved the indians off of the eastern lands and moved them west, it killed off of thousands of Native Americans making it a very memorable and important impact on American history. Strictly defined, the Trail of Tears is the main route or routes that the Cherokees took from the Southeast to the land the U.S. government identified as their new home in Indian Territory (Bjornlund…

    • 1950 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Describe Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a western movie about the Sioux and Americans conflicts, was released in 2007 and was directed by Yves Simoneau. This movie occurs in the western part of America, in many Indian reservations. The main location was Pine Ridge, and the main battle was at Wounded Knee. The movie begins around the time when the Sioux were defeated at Little Bighorn.…

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays