Essay On Women's Rights In Revolutionary America

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The Natural Rights of Women during Revolutionary America
Although the colonists won against the British in the Revolutionary War, the win didn’t solve the problem of inequality towards women in America. Victory allowed America to become its own country separated from England, and gave the privilege of forming its own government; but this newfound freedom seemed to be aimed more towards the men of the country. “For many women the Revolution had been a strongly politicizing experience, but the newly created republic made little room for them as political being.” During revolutionary America, women were continually being viewed as the stereotypical housewife that is to keep house and home in a suitable manner for her husband and her family. She
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Only white men were allowed to vote or deal with any political decision while women’s personal opinions didn’t matter. Women, such as Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and Julia Ward Howe, wouldn’t tolerate this unfair treatment; these women helped in beginning a social movement known as the National American Woman Suffrage Association in 1890 to obtain voting rights from each established state in America. “Although women had been voting in some states since the colonial era, other states denied women that right.” Women didn’t feel this political viewpoint was fair in that women were members of society just as men were; they also felt that men would begin to get out of hand with their newly found power. Betsy Erkkila wrote in her article, Revolutionary Women, “Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the Laidies we are determined to foment a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation" These revolutionary women then began to take a stand against the inequality they were suffering in the political world by participating in anything they could to prove their

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