Essay On Sir Gawain And The Green Knight

1168 Words 5 Pages
Just as she lands her perfect beam routine and wins the gold medal in the 2012 Summer Olympics, she reflects back on her dedication to get there, “I had to face a lot coming through this journey, a lot of sacrifices, difficulties, challenges, and injuries.” Although, she is known to be a perfect gymnast Gabby Douglas is not the first to run into challenges and achieve perfection. Sir Gawain, a knight from King Arthur's court Camelot, is proclaimed a perfect knight after his tempting journey. In the well-known poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, this acclaimed knight’s commitment to following the Code of Chivalry was tested for a whole year. Significantly, in the poem, the Green Knight arrives in Camelot and challenges the knights to a dare, …show more content…
In a moment of confusion, Sir Gawain rises up to show he is a loyal, pious, and self-deprecating Knight of the Round Table. To began, the reader is introduced to Sir Gawain and recognizes his loyalty when he says, “Would you grant me the grace… to be gone from this bench and stand by you there” (Borroff l. 118). Evidently, Sir Gawain takes King Arthur’s life out of harm’s way by replacing him in the deadly dare that is presented in front of Camelot because he values King Arthur’s life over his own. Furthermore, not only is Sir Gawain loyal to King Arthur, but he is also loyal to God. In the same fashion, Sir Gawain reveals he is pious before he pursues the dare. Immediately before the dare, King Arthur gives Sir Gawain “God’s blessing, and graciously prays That his heart and his hand may be hardy both” (Borroff l. 143-144). Indeed, Sir Gawain demonstrates his devotion since he asks for God’s blessing before he proceeds with the dare. Lastly, Sir Gawain volunteers for the dare because he is self-deprecating about his own life. Stepping up to the challenge Sir Gawain announces, “I am the weakest, well I know, and of wit feeblest… the loss of my life would be the least of any” (Borroff l. 128-129). Certainly, Sir Gawain feels if he loses his life in this dare it would be the have the least impact of the Knights of the Round Table. All in all, Sir Gawain …show more content…
Honorable, courteous, and respect for women are displayed in Sir Gawain's year-long journey to finish his dare. Sir Gawain’s honor is evident when he “sets off to keep his promise to the Green Knight” (Ridley 65). Instead of fleeing and neglecting to implement his part of the dare, Sir Gawain sets forth on his journey to find the Green Knight. Therefore, the Code of Chivalry is embodied in Sir Gawain by proving he is fair to his enemies, which is honorable. Furthermore, Sir Gawain worries he is neglecting to be courteous to the lady of the castle when he notes that he fears, “that he should behave like a churl, but more afraid of a woman to his honor, if he behaved badly to his host” (Ridley 67). It is important to realize that Sir Gawain's worries about his lack of courteous behavior reveal he is, in fact, courteous already. Indeed, he is being courteous to his host because it is a trait of the Code of Chivalry. Moreover, Sir Gawain proves he has respect towards women by omitting to lie when he admits, “By St. John I have no lover, nor will have one now” (Ridley 67). Notably, when the lady of the castle attempts to seduce Sir Gawain he shows his utmost respect for her by acknowledging he has no women in his life, but will not pursue her. Hence, Sir Gawain unveils a key trait, respecting women, of the knightly Code of Chivalry. By and large, the Code

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