Essay On Genetic Engineering

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Genetic Engineering Imagine a world with no genetic diseases or illnesses, where both humans and animals are born healthy without the possibility of inheriting or contracting a deadly disease. With genetic engineering, this world could become reality. Genetic engineering is the process of modifying the characteristics of an organism by altering its genetic material. Genetic engineering is a touchy subject. Many questions arise when the topic of genetic engineering comes up, many of them being moral and ethical questions on how far experiments should go and why. Genetic engineering should be further explored because it can currently produce insulin and human growth hormones, could possibly eradicate certain diseases, could be used in “designing” …show more content…
The vessel contains all the nutrients needed for growth. When the fermentation is complete, the mixture containing the bacteria is harvested. The bacteria are filtered off and broken open to release the insulin they have produced. It is then purified and packaged into bottles for distribution." (ABPI)
This process makes the insulin much safer and gets rid of the possibility of being contaminated from the sample it was harvested from (ABPI). From the production of insulin to the elimination of disease, genetic modification offers many benefits to humans.
Genetic engineering could be used to modify unborn children to rid them of illnesses or diseases that they would have to live with for the rest of their life or could possibly kill them (Rinkesh). Stephen Hawking once spoke about how genetic engineering could be used to better the human race: "With genetic engineering, we will be able to increase the complexity of our DNA, and improve the human race. But it will be a slow process, because one will have to wait about 18 years to see the effect of changes to the genetic code." (Rinkesh). Genetic engineering could have benefits for humans, but it could benefit animals as
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Besides creating ethical issues, this also opens up a whole new level of discrimination. Those that have not been "modified" or "enhanced" may feel that they are inferior. On the other side of the spectrum, those that parents decided to modify their children may be bullied by other children because they are "artificial" or are not "all natural."Genes could be alternated to make better athletes. This has been referred to as gene doping. This leads to the problem of consent and a genetic aristocracy. Since children cannot give consent to be modified, there is no way to tell whether or not they would want to be. Another problem that arises is conflict between the child and its parents. If the parents have their children modified to be gifted in a certain area, such as athletics, and the child grows up to hate sports, then there may be problems between the parents and the child. If only the very wealthy had access to this technology, a genetic aristocracy would be installed, where the genetically modified humans are on top (Simmons). The gene editing technologies that we use now can be compared to breeding, except that the technologies used now are precise and deliberate. "The newest gene-editing tools are different from breeding in one fundamental and, many would say, positive way. "We 're [now changing traits] in a more targeted way — we actually know what we 're doing" says Alison Van

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