Scientific Revolution Vs Religion

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Modern Science would unarguably be completely different without the Scientific Revolution. It was a major moment in the history of Western Culture, not to mention science and it’s history as a whole. Out of the Scientific Revolution came modern science and things like the scientific method were created. Countless scientific discoveries came from the great research of key figures in the scientific revolution such as Newton, Galileo, and Copernicus. The scientific revolution took place in a location and era where the majority of the population practiced Christianity, so as a result Christianity was a very prominent part of the culture during that time. This fact brings many questions to mind. Particularly the question, was religion a retarding …show more content…
As a result of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, and Ptolemy’s theories, a lot of people thought that the Earth was at the center of the universe orbited by several “crystal spheres” . Outside of these spheres was heaven, and the kingdom of God. This theory could accomplish several things. It could bring someone comfort that heaven is close by. It could clear all doubt that heaven may not exist. And it could reinforce the religion by making people think that Earth and the people who live on it are the most important since it’s the center of the …show more content…
Religion aided the development of the scientific revolution because up until the French Revolution, the Church was the main funder and sponsor of scientific research. The Church also paid for friars, monks, and priests to learn at universities. The Church even pushed for mathematics and science to be a mandatory part of their education. So as a result, a large amount of the scientific discoveries during this period were made because of funding from the Church. Also, before the nineteenth century, science didn 't really have any practical applications. The only reason to study science before then, was out of curiosity or religious devotion. Christians and the Church had believed God created the universe and it’s laws of nature. To study and learn of this universe and it’s laws was to study and learn about the work of God. This caused more people to become scientists as they had a passion for their religion. But, even though religion did aid in the development of the scientific revolution, it also hindered it’s development. As it has been going on for centuries, the scientific revolution was no different. The constant battle between religion and science was still a prominent factor during the scientific revolution. Martin Luther, the leader of the protestant reformation, denounced the studies of Tycho Brahe, Johnnes Kepler and Nicolaus Copernicus. Galileo was

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