The Internment Of Japanese-Americans During World War II

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World War II was a difficult time period due to the internment of the Japanese-Americans. Because it was during World War II, the Japanese decided to bomb Pearl Harbor. As a result, Franklin D. Roosevelt feared that the Japanese-Americans were working as spies for the Japanese which is why he forced them into internment camps.

The imprisonment of the Japanese-Americans was greatly affected by racism. All of the Japanese-Americans were forced to move to internment camps soon after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Franklin D. Roosevelt feared that the Japanese-Americans were working as spies for the Japanese which led to the imprisonment.
The reasoning of the imprisonment of the Japanese-Americans is based around the fact that the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Without having any evidence, Franklin D. Roosevelt automatically assumed that the Japanese-Americans were working as spies for the Japanese. Although Franklin D. Roosevelt was trying to protect the other U.S. citizens, he was not considering the safety of the Japanese-Americans. He was only focused on the thought that

First of all,
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They were not Japanese. They were Americans, and many of them — more than 30,000 — served loyally in the U.S. military with over 800 killed in combat during World War II.
The story of Japanese internment is nothing new in U.S. history and the attitudes that allowed that injustice continue to the present day. This may be a country that claims lofty ideals, but words are cheap. Rather than continuing our failure to uphold those ideals by continually finding new groups to hate and restrict, we should learn from our past and realize that the best way to show our patriotism is to work toward actually achieving a society that values liberty and justice for

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