Japanese Internment Camps During Ww2

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Imagine being torn from your house and stripped of your civil rights and liberties because of your race. This is what happened during World War II after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. The United States’ citizens and government officials were suspicious of the Japanese-Americans being disloyal to their country. This fear became the reason many people lived in military-style barracks surrounded by barbed wire fences and guards at an internment camp (Interview 2). What was life like to live there for the duration of the war? How did the Japanese-Americans feel? This topic was of interest to me because of the camp’s lasting effects on people and the government. Understanding the internees daily lives in WWII is difficult, but having knowledge …show more content…
The attack came as a surprise. The state of Washington sent a warning of what was happening, but it was too late. Japan succeeded in destroying eighteen ships and killing or injuring more than 3,500 Americans. (Welcome to the Attack on Pearl Harbor). This attack led to the United States’ involvement in World War II (Roosevelt Ushers in Internment). Most non-Japanese-Americans were paranoid thinking some Japanese people could be spying or working for Japan. In reality, though, two thirds of the Japanese-Americans had never gone to Japan (Tulelake). President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the U.S. Congress tried to problem solve to overcome their fear. They discussed this topic through many congressional meetings. Wilson and his colleagues eventually signed the Executive Order 9066 in the February of 1942, which allowed for the establishment of Japanese Internment Camps, but deprived them of their rights (Japanese-American …show more content…
were arrested by the military without due process and required to go to an Internment Camp (Tule Lake Segregation). They received instructions that told them where to meet the day of evacuation. The Japanese-Americans were ordered to bring only enough linens, clothing, toiletries, eating utensils for their immediate family. They were told not to bring pets and were not allowed to ship goods to the camp (Instructions of Japanese Ancestry). Some were given weeks, others just days to prepare for their future life behind fences (Bainbridge Island). Before departing, one Japanese-American showed his rights in a nonviolent way by placing a sign on a store window; it read : “I am an American.” The store was closed because the owner was taken away to live in a camp, but the sign was a powerful reminder of their citizenship (Japanese Internment at a Glance). The Japanese-Americans were forced to leave behind their jobs, houses, friends, and property. They were then transported in mass numbers on trains to the assembly centers (Roosevelt Ushers in

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