Analysis Of Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADD)

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Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a lifelong, persistent pattern of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development across time and setting (ADDA, 1). It is also called Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). They are both considered the same, but have differences as well. Many things contribute to Attention Deficit Disorder such as: family medical history, injuries, and other previously known disorders. In the Middle Ages demonic possession was the main concern people had, but they also blamed immoral behaviors of the parent and grandparents of why the loved one suffered for this (Sheen, 12). Terms such as restlessness disorder, minimal brain dysfunction, and hyperkinetic impulse disorder …show more content…
The options to get the Devil out of family members and loved ones included: herbal remedies, hypnotism, and religious devotion. If they didn’t improve they were locked away in cages forever. If they were not locked away they went into surgery, which meant they had a hole drilled into their heads to “let the Devil escape,” (12). If they went through surgery most died quickly. The last option they had was to be burned alive so the Devil would die with them (12). There is no real known cause to ADD, but five to eight percent of children in the United States of America are affected by Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD, 66). Out of these five to eight percent one half of them will carry it on into adulthood. The most common problem children and adults with ADD have is in their limbic system. The limbic system is various structures in the brain that involve emotion, motivation, and emotional association (66). When scientists look at this system they notice there is an imbalance of neurotransmitters and this leads to dysfunction of the …show more content…
There are many symptoms from the three subtypes. The three subtypes are: predominantly combined type, predominantly inattentive type, and predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type. The most common of these types is the combined type, which has significant symptoms of all three types (O.P. 1). To be diagnosed for ADD one must have several symptoms: present by age seven to twelve, seen in two or more settings (such as work, school, home, etc.), must interfere with quality of social, school, or work functioning, or not better explained by another mental disorder (ADDA,

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