Development of the Social Brain During Adolescence Essay

6437 Words Jun 16th, 2013 26 Pages
Development of the social brain during adolescence
Sarah-Jayne Blakemore
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK
Adolescence is usually defined as the period of psychological and social transition between childhood and adulthood. The beginning of adolescence, around the onset of puberty, is characterized by large hormonal and physical changes. The transition from childhood to adulthood is also characterized by psychological changes in terms of identity, self-consciousness, and cognitive flexibility. In the past decade, it has been demonstrated that various regions of the human brain undergo development during adolescence and beyond. Some of the brain regions that undergo particularly protracted
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If you search for
[Theory of Mind in autism] on the web today you get over one million entries! Uta’s work on autism and dyslexia is not just renowned amongst scientists, but has also made a significant impact on teachers, clinicians, carers, and parents.
Doing work experience with Uta all those years ago was truly inspirational.
I met Uta again when I was doing a PhD with
Chris Frith. In 2000, Uta asked me to help her write a report for the Economic and Social
Research Council (ESRC) on the implications of brain research for education. Uta had the vision to realise that this would soon become an important area of science. Indeed, brain and education research is now a flourishing discipline in itself,
Correspondence should be addressed to Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College
London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK. E-mail: s.blakemore@ucl.ac.uk
I am grateful to the Royal Society, UK, which funds my research.
40 # 2008 The Experimental Psychology Society http://www.psypress.com/qjep DOI:10.1080/17470210701508715
THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
2008, 61 (1), 40–49 with ring-fenced funding, dedicated international conferences, books, and a new journal. While writing the ESRC report, Uta and I were struck by the

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