Kant And David Hume Similarities

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Hurthouse’s analysis of emotions in ethics is quite intriguing. She seems to try and find the middle ground between two of the most influential philosophers of all time. David Hume and Kant. As a result, I will try to explain both their views, Hurthouse’s view, and an argumentative paragraph explain their differences and similarities. According to David Hume, morality is something that is unable to be created via reason alone. Primarily since because ideologies are incapable of motivating us enough to act. As result, according to Hume, morality comes from emotions. Our emotions make the judgment on what is right or wrong, and that leads us to approve or disapprove of the act. We may reason why exactly or the many different scenarios where an action or duty may appear moral at first glance, what W.D. Ross may call “prima facie duties”, but not necessarily after careful consideration. Nevertheless, according to Hume it is that emotional feeling that makes us determine what is right or wrong, morally. Finally, being skeptic there is no surprise David Hume, makes the claim there is no such thing as absolute morality, but all morality judgments are subjective. Immanuel Kant’s view on morality is centered primarily around his notion of duty. This duty is derived from, what he calls the categorical …show more content…
However, both are flawed in my opinion. David Hume’s belief that morality is based on emotion and Kant on his belief that morality is based on the categorical imperative. I believe these two ideologies lie at both ends of the extreme. Nevertheless, given only the two arguments, I must say that morality must be determined more on reason that emotion. Therefore, I would have to side with Immanuel Kant. Nevertheless, that leads me to Hurthouse’s analysis on these views. Which appears to try and find the “mean” between these two extreme, ideologies in my

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