Congressional Term Limits

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Term Limits

There have been many proposals to reform Congress in order to increase its effectiveness, reliability, and accountability. One of these proposals include term limits, which are legally prescribed limits on the number of terms an elected official can serve. Although term limits are argued to be the most efficient way to reform Congress, there are many ways in which they can be considered ineffective and even detrimental. In addition, even if term limits are effective, it is often questioned whether Congress is even meant to be effective.

Term limits will essentially be able to get new faces into Congress, something that many consider necessary in terms of Congressional reform. There are many reasons why this is necessary; for
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Case studies show that the longer an individual holds office, the more likely they are to stop serving the public’s needs and start serving their own interests. Term limits make corruption within Congress less likely because it limits the amount of time an individual holding office can be influenced by the power they receive. One of the most important reasons term limits are said to be necessary is that they will bring fresh ideas into Congress. Without term limits, it is extremely easy for incumbents to hold office for very long periods of time, which prevents many potentially great leaders from making a positive change. If the same people are holding office, no progress or new ideas will be made.

Although there are many proponents of Congressional term limits, there are also many opponents with just as many arguments. One such argument is that term limits filter individuals with absolutely no experience into Congress. Although new members may bring in diversity, they also lack experience and the skills that come along with it. In addition, opponents of term limits argue that the longer an individual holds office, the more aware of their constituents they become. This is because, in order to continue holding office, they need to appeal to the people and work for their
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Proponents argue that term limits, which restrict the number of terms a legislator can hold office, can result in greater diversity, can allow new ideas, and can reduce corruption within Congress. However, opponents argue that term limits bring inexperienced, and therefore incapable, individuals into Congress. They also argue that incumbents are more aware of their constituents’ needs and have the incentive to provide for them; therefore, term limits are not necessary. Although both sides make very good points, term limits are in fact necessary in Congress. This reform proposal could solve many problems within Congress by bringing in fresh ideas and

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