Freud's Last Session Summary And Analysis

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There was a portion in Benjamin Franklin’s life in which he was arguably one of the most audacious men to live in all of American history. To demonstrate, there was a time in which he felt pleasure in arguing with people. When he transitioned into adulthood, he experienced a transformation that motivated him to prioritize listening to others’ opinions which caused him to cease contradicting people in conversations. His maturity paved the way for many individuals to see the importance of having a balance between making valid points in conversations but also being receptive to others. Similarly, Freud’s Last Session written by Mark St. Germain revolves around the conversation between a Christian named C.S. Lewis and an atheist named Sigmund Freud. …show more content…
Freud is still able to conduct a few sensible arguments, albeit he doubts Christianity and makes countless weak allegations. Freud says how he is contemplating on committing suicide due to the fact that he does not want his oral cancer to kill him. Nevertheless, Lewis condemns this motive and attempts to critique Freud using Aquinas’ belief. As Freud says, “I don’t care what Aquinas believes! Aquinas condemns suicide, yet preaches the death penalty! How can someone of your intelligence see the world in black and white when there are a thousand colors around you?” (44). Therefore, Freud makes an excellent remonstration in the conversation because he specifically identifies the double standard in Aquinas’ belief. His reasoning pierces directly through Lewis’ defense on Aquinas and exposes how there are times that even famous Christians can hold contrasting beliefs. Furthermore, Freud eventually conveys how he believes that science and religion conflict with each other: “We speak different languages. You believe in revelation. I believe in science, the dictatorship of reason. There is no common ground” (35). Nonetheless, Freud introduces an erroneous expostulation because science can be effectively used to defend religion. More specifically, it is reasonable for a scientist to be religious due to the fact that the Earth is so beautifully and wonderfully designed. More specifically, God has designed the Earth in such a perfect way through factors such as water, air, and heat that all combine together to make human life possible unlike any other planet. As a final point, Freud intellectually identifies a weakness in Aquinas’ belief, yet he stubbornly articulates his opinion on how science and religion are

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