Difference Between Presidential And Parliamentary Government

Decent Essays
Introduction

Despite their similarities in culture, Canada and the United States are run by vastly different political systems. Though both nations are federal states, Canada has a parliamentary system of government while the United States has a republic system (Wiseman 14-09-22). The American president and Canadian prime minister are both very influential figures, but this influence on their nations and governments manifests itself in different ways. There is great debate over which country’s system of government offers more power to its executive, and what exactly these powers entail. This essay will argue that Canadian prime ministers have far more and unrestrained powers than American presidents, but this comes at the cost of democracy. It will demonstrate this by reviewing the systemic differences between American presidential and Canadian parliamentary government, and exploring the ways in which the American president and Canadian Prime Minister can enter
…show more content…
It immediately politicizes the presidency because the constitution says nothing about how the veto power should be used, just that it can be used (Hurl 13-10-24). The creators of the constitution did not put the same constraints on executive power that they did legislative power, giving the president a great advantage. As previously explained, the president is free from the control of the legislative branch and is not accountable to it. That the legislative majority has no direct control over the presidency is one of the most fundamental differences between the American and Canadian political systems. However, despite it not having power over the president, the presidential veto allows the president to have some power over the legislative branch through his potential to use the veto power. It also allows the president to control bureaucracy in that he can control the kinds of bureaucracy that Congress makes (Hurl

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Canadian Prime Minister

    • 1700 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Prime Ministers power over their party, voting system and appointive power, far outweigh the ability of a president. Prime Ministers can appoint and be a crucial member in determining who their party officially elects to run in electoral districts around Canada. They choose their cabinet, and (If they have a majority) they are able to pass law as they see fit. When it comes to manipulating the voting system, the President is at a disadvantage. With the title of head of state, the active president receives immense public exposure, and if they receive good publicity, can help them win another term.…

    • 1700 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Now in the United State, the Constitution divides formal power in foreign policymaking between the President and Congress. The President has the right to maintain the initiative, it means the President has more power than the Congress. The President can implement the foreign policy , negotiates treaties, proclaim friendship, so this make the President become more powerful. However, the Congress can reject the President 's initiatives if they have enough ratified refusal . In this way, the President can not be too powerful that he can do whatever he wants.…

    • 1489 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This government can be effective and efficient but has numerous vulnerabilities. Johannes stated a question, “would a parliamentary system be preferable to the American presidential system (18)?” However, who can truly say what type of government is prime. Every government is going to possess vulnerabilities. Moreover, I don 't believe that a Parliamentary government will benefit the American government since the American government is based on freedom and the people. A Parliamentary system gives entirely too much power to the leader and America’s government separates the party, however, the president is the leader.…

    • 1402 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Canadian “first past the post system” is a prime example of how an outdated system does not reflect the national needs from an electoral system. This system only works efficiently when there are two parties running, since the runner who is elected is the one who receives the highest number of votes. However, Canada needs a system that will allow for separate parties and candidates to support each other and to gain a consensus of national needs. In turn, proportional representations offer independent minority political parties a better chance of being elected into parliament, and compete at the political level, as well requiring political parties and governments to achieve a similar agreement or consensus, ultimately leading to the creation of stable policies. These stable policies, in turn, allow for several political parties to have their ideas proposed and placed into action (Theweek.co.uk, 2016).…

    • 2155 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Similarly, Article VI would cause treaties to trump national law, giving them the same status of power as the Constitution (U.S constitution). Ian Murray, vice president at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, argues the difference between the U.S. and European countries is that, in most countries, treaties are ratified by a vote of Parliament or by an executive decision. They then supposedly have the force of law, but few countries have the means of citizen enforcement of such law, which is why they can be safely ignored when convenient (Murray). Other nations don 't play by the rules of the game, whereas the U.S. is forced to. Ratifying treaties has less to do with the stage of democracy a state is in and more to do with what the State can gain from it.…

    • 959 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In Britain however, there such limitation on the Prime Minister’s power. However, his room for movement on various policies, for example, depends on his party’s majority in the House of Commons. The larger the majority, the more easily the PM and the government can get through policies and legislation, without the interference of any branches such as in the U.S. Therefore, if the Prime Minister has a large majority, he or she can make a significant change in Britain during their time in power (Ndla.no). In summary, both nations a\have two chambers, however the U.S.’s political system can give the President more limited power than the PM’s in…

    • 1014 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Canada Prime Minister

    • 764 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Similarly, to the issue with the Constitution, this type of government is also loosely structured in terms of defining the role of the prime minister, which has added to rise in power. Though it is synonymous with responsible government, “the great weakness of the Westminster system as practiced in Canada is that it lacks firm rules and thus must rely on the prime minister to act in good faith and not abuse those powers for merely partisan advantage”. In contrast to Canada, the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries, like Australia and New Zealand, have taken the liberties to write some sort of role outline. The possibility remains that a leader could have mal intentions, leaving Canadians to put their trust in the prime minister to govern in an honest manner, without the misuse of their…

    • 764 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Two Presidencies Theory

    • 876 Words
    • 4 Pages

    While the president is able to pass executive orders to change policy, these orders may be defunded by congress, counteracted by congressional legislation, or deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. In addition, although a president is able to veto legislation, if a president continually vetoes legislation, the public may not look on him/her favorably, which would impact their electability. These factors seem to limit the president’s power greatly; however, so long as the president’s executive order is not unconstitutional, the president still wields remarkable power, as Congress would need a majority opposition in order to defund the president’s executive order. Furthermore, many of the president’s constituents could be swayed if the president were to deliver a speech concerning the necessity of his executive order. The executive branch, being the largest branch in government, requires that the president divides his power among the vice president, department heads, and heads of independent agencies in order to accomplish all of the administration’s tasks.…

    • 876 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Maintaining a democracy is a complex balance in any modern day democratic government, to which Canada is no exception. Democracy essentially demands that the power lies with the common people, not with the people who rule. Evaluating a democracy is no easy task, there are many considerations and different opinions of what demonstrates an optimal democracy. Canada is consistently ranked in the top twenty countries by different analyses, however, Canada is also well known for a growing democratic deficit. This is further evident with ongoing political debates on electoral and senate reform seeking solutions to the increasing democratic deficit.…

    • 1489 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The system of checks and balances keeps the branches of government in order and stops one branch from becoming more powerful than the others. We also have the two party system, between Democrats and Republicans, which is a constant power struggle and vie for dominance. The two party system in conjunction with judicial review hinders the efficiency of passing legislation. In Canada, the branches of government have different tasks that they are in charge of. The federal, provincial, and local governments all have different areas of focus that they are in charge of reforming.…

    • 1163 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays