Characters In Richard III And Paradise Lost And John Milton

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While studying diabolical literature, different thoughts have come about from specific characters. In Shakespeare’s Richard III, the concept of the devil portraying in Richard’s life remains strongly known throughout the book. The controversial ideas related to the devil in the play, distinguish how diabolical features sustain in people and how affects impact others. Primarily, Richard achieves evilness in the play, but does not remain unstoppable. John Milton’s demonic epic poem Paradise Lost, provides readers with demons and evilness between specific characters. Heaven and hell or god and Satan, demonstrate an opposite relationship between each other. While god remains peaceful and pleasing, Satan sustains the life of hatred and over confidence …show more content…
In Paradise Lost, Satan provides the readers with a long soliloquy. The comparisons between the two readings provides more in depth similarities addressed in Shakespeare’s play and Milton’s epic poem. The play Richard III and the epic poem Paradise Lost share many similarities involving the devil or diabolical figures found in the characters. The protagonist of Richard III involves Richard while in Paradise Lost, Satan assumingly remains as the protagonist. The soliloquies stated in the play and poem provide diabolical features involved with the protagonist. Between the two soliloquies, the similarities mentioned from both Richard and Satan, develop a mindset involving the diabolical figures each of them encounter. For example, Richard does not know evil continues to follow him until the ghost of all the people he …show more content…
Once Richard sees the ghost from all the people he murdered, he realizes how he had become a mass murderer. Up until the end of the play, Richard did not believe he would change, but soon realized how he did not think highly of himself once he saw the ghost. For example, “Murder, stern murder in the direst degree, All several sins, all used in each degree, Throng to the bar, crying all, Guilty! Guilty!” (Shakespeare 137). Richard ultimately realized how he has become a murderer without remorse until now. The different ghost came to provide Richard with information on he acts and demonstrates character throughout the play. Unfortunately, the time was too late and he now had to overcome his fear. Milton demonstrates Satan as an anti-hero or a character who makes choices to later result in destruction of their own. In fact, Richard and Satan result as an anti-hero. For example, “Left for repentance, none for pardon left? None left but by submission and that word disdain forbids me and my dread of shame among the spirits beneath whom I seduced” (Milton 80). The similarity between Richard and Satan continues as accomplishing the anti-hero throughout the play and epic poem. Richard chose to become a murderer and kill family, friends, and random people throughout the play. A result of his actions was

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