Characteristics Of Adolf Hitler As A Psychopaths

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Repetitive violence is an act of a person being a psychopath. During the World War II, under Adolf Hitler’s dictatorship he became controlling, manipulating, and violent with the help of others like the Nazis’ soldiers. Hitler’s acts may have triggered the soldiers to become like him. Adolf was an intelligent person to be able to know how to control most of Europe and the National Socialist Party. His actions can confirm whether he is a psychopath and made others become psychopaths. Anne Blankman, the author of the book, Prisoner of Night and Fog, early on Blackman explains that a doctor is staying at a boardinghouse owned by Gretchen Müller’s mother and he would like to gain a better understanding of Adolf Hitler. Dr. Whitestone considers …show more content…
Although, his childhood played an important role in the development of his character. Each time period of Hitler 's life contributed to his personality traits. Within Hitler’s autobiography, Mein Kampf, he described his parents as examples of German values: “My father was a dutiful civil servant, my mother giving all her being to the household, and devoted above all us to children in eternal, loving care.” Hitler does not go in-depth about his parents in his autobiography, but historians mention that he loved his mother deeply and feared his father. There is numerous amounts evidence to prove Hitler’s feeling towards his father. Hitler told his secretary, Christi Schroeder, “I did not love my father, but I was all the more afraid of him. He had tantrums and immediately became physically violent. My poor mother would be always scared for me” (Hyland et. al. …show more content…
In the final weeks of WWI, Hitler’s regiment suffered a poison-gas attack. The soldiers recovered their eyesight fairly soon. Hitler didn’t recover as quickly as the others and was labeled a “hysteric.” All “hysterical soldiers” had to be quarantined because their nervous condition was thought to be contagious, according to a Berlin War Ministry decree. Hitler was sent to a military hospital in Pasewalk, Pomerania. He was a problematic patient that other doctors called in a consulting specialist named Edmund Forster, who then diagnosed Hitler as a “classical psychopath.” Hitler was able to see again, but when he delivered the news of Germany’s surrender. The knowledge that his beloved adopted country has been defeated was more than he could handle and he temporarily lost his sight again. By the end of November, he recovered and was now planning to become the Nationals Socialist German Workers’ (Nazi) Party. Forster said Hitler is unlike anyone he has ever encountered in his medical career. He has traits of a certain type of personality, but he appears to be a narcissist and swing wildly from high to low moods with a rapid speed. “Forster also says that he is a volcanic eruption, a lightning strike in the desert, a man perhaps with several different mentally diseased conditions. By all rights, he should be impossible. And yet he exists” (Blankman 300,

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