What Was The Role Of Education In Nazi Germany Essay

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During Hitler’s rule, Germany embraced in his anti-Semitic ideologies and the Aryan race flourished in regards to militarism and nationalism. Hitler placed a strong emphasis on the manipulation of youth as mentioned in one of his books ‘Mein Kampf’, ‘Whoever has the youth has the future.’ Hitler used the education system to portray Nazi views and school systems to glorify war. Youth Groups were created and propaganda and fear were blended in to manipulate the naïve children. The above ensured that Hitler produced a generation of blindly loyal Germans and ideal fighting soldiers. However, it did have its flaws as there were numerous resistance groups such as the ‘White Rose’, ‘Swing Kids’ and ‘Edelweiss Pirates’ who bravely rebelled against …show more content…
Education played an important role in spreading Nazi ideologies and aiming to produce a new generation of obedient and loyal German youth. Hitler believed that the key to control was to mould their way of thinking at an early age. After the Reich Ministry of Education took over the education system in 1934, the main two focusses for teachers are to encourage teamwork through physical education and to embed Nazi ideology in children’s minds. To ensure that the children were fully indoctrinated, Hitler placed special emphasis on subjects in order to produce the ‘ideal Nazis’. For example, History books were exaggerated and focussed on the unfairness of the Treaty of Versailles and the wickedness of Jews. Geography was mainly concentrated on the Lebensraum and PE was trebled to make youth more disciplined and capable of being soldiers. Also, he …show more content…
The Hitler Youth and the League of German Girls (BDM) were used by the Nazi to shape the beliefs and thinking of 10-18 year old Germans. They targeted the Aryan race collectively and prepared them to be soldiers or mothers. Hitler youth was set up by Adolf Hitler in 1933 to train boys and prepare them for the Army or SS. Youth leaders used tightly controlled group activities and staged propaganda events such as parades and documentaries to impress Nazi ideologies to create a sense of community. Activities that encouraged teamwork were often done such as hiking, marching, weekend camps, singing etc. Also, older boys were given more war-centered activities like doing drills, trench digging, grenade throwing, gas defence and a variety of other military activities. At first, the boys were very enthusiastic to prove themselves and contribute to their nation. However, the number of Hitler Youth around 1936 drastically decreased to 25% because of the increase of meetings. By then, attendance became compulsory. At the same time, he abolished other existing teenage clubs, thus making Hitler Youth more attractive. The BDM trained girls for comradeship, domestic duties and motherhood. Similarly to the Hitler Youth Group, it concentrated on collective tasks and produced ‘virile and strong’ girls. Therefore, the Hitler youth organisations were very successful in the indoctrination and total control of youth,

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