Hitler Myth Essay: The Fuhrer Of Germany

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Hitler Myth The Fuhrer of Germany is depicted as one who holds great heroic leadership. Adolf Hitler fit the title of the Fuhrer through his policies, ideologies and institutions that created an influential third regime. Through mass support of the German people, Hitler took action to restore the greatness of Germany. In attempt to improve the country, Hitler became a slave to his power and what it signified. The Hitler Myth is shown through history through the "ready-made terrain of pre-existing beliefs, prejudices, and phobias" that allowed Hitler to attain "propriety of the German people" (5 Kershaw). Through propaganda, fear, anti-socialism and his charismatic authority; Hitler becomes a savior to the people and the struggles within Germany. …show more content…
Prior to World War One, leaders "acted on the basis of emotional drives originating in the pre-World War I attitudes" (Krebs, 40). These drives were based on the goal to drive Germany to greatness and express patriotism. In a sonnet known as "Peace" written in 1914, Rubert Brooke expresses his patriotism toward Germany during World War One. In allowing him to take part of the war he thanked "God, who has matched us with his hour, And caught our youth, and wakened us from sleeping" where he would be glad to become a "swimmer into cleanness leaping" (Brooke). This poem depicts the attitude of attaining salvation through the war, as though the war were ones penance where they will achieve peace. The war brought upon a desire for repentance from God and a want to achieve 'German greatness '. The Hitler Myth uses the pre-world war one attitudes in order to create this idea that under his control, he will rise Germany out of …show more content…
Prior to elections, Hitler was not seen in the Government as a strong politician, but rather a back fall if the German circumstances worsened. Prior to the elections the Reichstag building was burnt down which led Hitler to assume this was a tactic for communist takeover. Using fear of communism, Hitler was able to convince President Hindenburg to pass the Enabling Act. The Enabling Act was created on March 23, 1933 and it gave Hitler the power to enact laws without the involvement of the Reichstag. This act is important in the Hitler myth, because it is one of the many examples in which Hitler used policies and fear to gain full dictatorship. Hitler played up "the anti-communist stance of his party, presenting his movement as a bulwark against Bolshevism." (Bendersky, 84). The act allowed communist to be violently attacked or incarcerated. When elections took place in 1933, it showed it was Hitler who could save the people of Germany from communism, while the SA could use violence to intimidate other political

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