Cesare Beccaria's Theory Of The Rational Choice Theory In Criminal Justice

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Criminals have been committing crimes for centuries and will continue to do so. One of the most mind boggling idea is that criminals choose to offend. The question is why do they choose to offend is it for the thrill, for revenge, or for the reward that the offender will get. Many theorists and sociologists say that people have the free will to do what they want and say what they want. However, criminals see crime as a promise to have a huge payoff. Individuals make choices everyday based on what the reward will be and what the consequence are. But for an offender/criminal the reward is much greater than the consequence and/or punishment. Their choice is called the Rational Choice Theory. They rationalize that the reason they commit …show more content…
So he burglarizes the house. Rational Choice Theory was developed by several different theorists, however, one of the most creative minds in criminal justice, Italian social philosopher, criminologist and politician, Cesare Beccaria, who lived from 1738 to 1794 was considered to be one of the best in his field. Cesare Beccaria 's thoughts in regards to criminal justice had a profound influence on the founding fathers of the United States and the criminal justice system. Beccaria is also known as one of the fathers of classical criminal …show more content…
That all criminals are rational coherent individuals who practice conscious decision making, that work towards gaining the maximum benefits of their current situation. Another aspect of rational choice theory is the fact that many offenders make decisions based on limited rationality. Therefore crime can be influenced by the opportunity that is present. That crime can be influenced by the status that it gives the offender, the excitement that they may get if they are or are not caught and the rewards of the crime. According to Cesare Beccaria, criminal laws are the terms of a social contract between the members of society and the state. The offender does not believe that they have to abide by them. “The rights of individuals are protected by the state through deterrence, threatening potential transgressors with just enough punishment to outweigh the pleasures of crime”

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