Case Study: Altruistic And Strategic Approach

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Altruistic and Strategic Approach (Contrast and congruence)
The altruistic approach is built on the assert of Bowen (1953), Davis (1970), Freeman (1984), and Woods (1991) who hold the view that an altruistic approach should be adopted when incorporating CSR into a firm’s business strategy. On the other hand, the strategic approach is built on the assertion of Jones (1995), Hart (1995), Baron (2001), McWilliams and Siege (2001) and Bangoli and Watts (2003) who rather hold that a strategic approach should be adopted. Based on the fact that this research is aimed at investigating whether the absence of sustainable corporate social responsibility policies, is the main reason for unethical corporate behaviour in developing countries, this researcher
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The question that arises in the mind of scholars is whether the approach adopted by Royal Dutch Shell in Nigeria is altruistic or strategic. Whatever approach is implemented by the Dutch firm in Nigeria, will be analysed in our subsequent findings. While some scholars hold view that the difference is that altruistic approach of CSR has a primary intention and stakeholder perception besides being purely academic. What could be better said is that primacy is given to wealth creation in some cases whereas in other cases it is given to effective stakeholder management. To better understand this philosophy properly, I will carry out a critical analysis on the nature of corporate …show more content…
A firm’s action can have enormous impacts on its products, though it is in compliance regulatory laws with regards to labour conditions while at the same time violates international laws. The debate about the role and responsibility of firms in contributing to an ecologically and socially viable economy is fuelled by this complexity. In the oil and gas sector there are varieties of social groups involved in trying to shape norms about corporate responsibility, notwithstanding the end results has not been encouraging. For these groups, there are a number of inroads to influencing corporate actions. There various ways of fostering certain corporate practice, such as Legislation, pressure from environmental or social activist groups and consumer boycotts. However research has indicated that these measures are not implemented or lightly implemented in developing countries than in developed countries. This is as a result of a recent emergence in views about corporate social responsibility and the duality of its altruistic or strategic concept. This debate has given rise as to what role corporations should play in the pursuit of social goals, and which arguments and avenues are appropriate for pursuing those goals

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