The Camera Movement Analysis

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This article contains many interesting theories about our original connections with camera movement as a semiotically connected consciousness, as well as referencing many early day thinkers and theorists of camera movement. Sobchack compares Merleau-Ponty and Husserl 's concepts of intentionality, exploring how the intentional acts of our consciousness correlate with how we experience the phenomenon of movement within the cinema space. Sobchack also covers how through the camera 's intentional act of expression, by directing itself at an object, leads us to be directed to it 's intentions not just drawn as a viewer through mediation of the camera but threaded through its perception as an 'other ' situated in the world. By doing so, we see …show more content…
Bresson explains that “your camera catches not only physical movements that are inapprehensible by pencil, brush or pen, but also certain states of soul recognizable by indices which it alone can reveal” (Bresson, pg 106). These certain states of soul represent our experience as a viewer seeing through the 'eye ' of an embodied subject. As cinematography is the means of creative film making through which the nature of film is exploited as according to Bresson, the images are charged with emotion and intimacy. He refers to this in one passage as attaining that “heart of the heart”, to discover the matter of which men and women (models) are made of. Sections I found especially interesting and supportive of my research and exploration of cinematic images were Sight and Hearing, On Fragmentation and The Real. Bresson tells us to dig into our sensations in relation to how we express our style of film making; “Look at what there is within. Don 't analyze it with worlds. Translate it into sister images, into equivalent sounds. The clearer it is, the more your style affirms itself (Style: all that is not technique) (Bresson, pg …show more content…
From the classic film style which has developed within traditional American film history, “naturalisation” of the cinematic space has evolved and become a base for the form of presentation and viewer experience. This term refers to the linear perspectives of realistic or mimetic paintings, but also the naturalistic presentation within space and time. It is this perspective that is mimicked through horizontally based dolly shots, painting the scene like a picture as the camera rolls past each presented space. Wes Anderson, whose films make use of the formal construction of this signature shot movement, is one of my inspirations as a developing cinematographer. Along with his favorite cinematographer, Robert Yeoman, Anderson creates theater-like compositions that reveal highly detailed sets and perfection within the frame. His signature x/y axis camera movement explores the immersible worlds within his films, which also mimics the linear perspective of a painting. His execution of “auteur” style narrative has nevertheless broadened his creative construction and authoritative navigation of cinema

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