Camera Movement Analysis

1489 Words 6 Pages
This article contains many interesting theories about our original connections with camera movement as a semiotically connected consciousness, as well as referencing many early day thinkers and theorists of camera movement. Sobchack compares Merleau-Ponty and Husserl 's concepts of intentionality, exploring how the intentional acts of our consciousness correlate with how we experience the phenomenon of movement within the cinema space. Sobchack also covers how through the camera 's intentional act of expression, by directing itself at an object, leads us to be directed to it 's intentions not just drawn as a viewer through mediation of the camera but threaded through its perception as an 'other ' situated in the world. By doing so, we see …show more content…
Capable of seeing and hearing it in its entirety at any instant but also knowing thoroughly what business the sound the image has there. “The exchanges that are produced between images and images, sounds and sounds, images and sounds, gives the people and objects in your films their cinematographic life and, by a subtle phenomenon, unify your composition” (Bresson, pg 55). This subtle phenomenon can be referenced back to camera movement, but also the power of creation your images have placed together, chosen in prevision of their inner association according to Bresson. By expressing through compression, imprinted images and sound, the power of your image can be brought in ten different routes, that will lead to ten different images (Bresson, pg 42). He speaks much of the language of images, but also how the specific combination of sight and sound are used as a sort of relay to work with each other. Not just supporting, but defining what is being …show more content…
From the classic film style which has developed within traditional American film history, “naturalisation” of the cinematic space has evolved and become a base for the form of presentation and viewer experience. This term refers to the linear perspectives of realistic or mimetic paintings, but also the naturalistic presentation within space and time. It is this perspective that is mimicked through horizontally based dolly shots, painting the scene like a picture as the camera rolls past each presented space. Wes Anderson, whose films make use of the formal construction of this signature shot movement, is one of my inspirations as a developing cinematographer. Along with his favorite cinematographer, Robert Yeoman, Anderson creates theater-like compositions that reveal highly detailed sets and perfection within the frame. His signature x/y axis camera movement explores the immersible worlds within his films, which also mimics the linear perspective of a painting. His execution of “auteur” style narrative has nevertheless broadened his creative construction and authoritative navigation of cinema

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