Brutus Tragic Flaw Analysis

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Friends should not go behind one another 's back and plot against them. Brutus declares, “Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more,” when he is explaining why Caesar is dead to the crowd of Romans (III.ii. 21-2). The intentions for stabbing Caesar are to simply protect Rome and the people. Killing Caesar is a result of Brutus’ tragic flaw. Evidence of Brutus’ tragic flaw also occurs when he fights against Octavius and Antony at Philippi. Normally Brutus appears as a peaceful man who would not encourage fighting, but because of his flaw he decides to march his troops to the war zone. Cassius and Brutus make the decision of going to meet the enemy at Philippi when Cassius insist, “Then, with your will, go on; / We’ll along ourselves …show more content…
The first event that shows how Brutus’ fate is reversed is when he and Cassius appear more desperate than Antony and Octavius. Brutus and Cassius are not getting along as well and fight over every decision made. A poet appears at the end of the fourth act and foreshadows future events. The poet says, “For shame, you generals! What do you mean? / Love, and be friends, as two such men should be; / For I have seen more years, I’m sure, than ye” (IV.iii. 128-30). This poet tells Brutus and Cassius to love each other. He also lectures that he is older than both of them and knows more about life. Cassius and Brutus go from best friends to bickering generals within a short amount of time. The tragic hero also undergoes a reversal of fortune whenever he is told that Portia, his wife, is dead. At this point in the story Brutus’ life is starting to take a major turn down hill. Brutus no longer comes off as a stoic whenever he proclaims, “No man bears sorrow better. Portia is dead” (IV.iii. 145). He lets out his emotions and shows grief, which is something he has not previously done in the play. Before, Brutus had a loving, caring wife, but now because of his tragic flaw forcing him into battle Brutus caused his wife to kill herself. Brutus now has nobody to love. Another example of how …show more content…
The audience feels bad for Brutus when he continuously has to fight against Octavius and Antony. Now that Cassius is dead, Brutus is in charge all by himself. Brutus decides his army, “shall try fortune in a second fight,” meaning Brutus was already victorious over Octavius, but now he must try to defeat Antony (V.iii. 110). The audience knows that Brutus has no hope against Antony because the troops are tired and Shakespeare has foreshadowed a tragic ending. These actions cause the audience to pity Brutus. Readers fill with grief for Brutus when he decides to kill himself. Brutus says, “I know my hour is come,” which makes the audience feel even more sympathy for the tragic hero (V.v.19). Committing suicide is a sign of severe struggle, and the audience clearly sees that Brutus has endured enough suffering. Fortunately for the audience, relief fills them through catharsis whenever Brutus’ body is taken to Octavius’ tent. Octavius and Antony are respectful of Brutus; Antony even calls him, “the most noblest Roman of them all,” which is important because after all Brutus killed the beloved Caesar (V.v.68). Audience members feel relief because they know that the intense action is over and Brutus put up a strong fight. Antony and Octavius’ actions comfort the audience because they know Brutus will receive proper burial and honor.

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