Why Is Blitzkrieg Important

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On September 1, 1939 the German Army commenced its invasion of Poland. The army invaded through the shared border that they had with Poland and even though the Polish Army was considered one of the best in the world they were defeated in around 18 days or just over two weeks. The Germans had more men, technology, and tactics on their side which made their mission successful against the Polish forces. The German forces when invading moved in from East Prussia, Germany in the North, Silesia, and Slovakia in the South. They used over 2,000 tanks and over 1,000 planes to break through the Polish defenses at the border. The Germans used the tactic of blitzkrieg to cripple the Polish armed forces by attacking airfields, railheads, troop concentrations …show more content…
That in turn made a large impact on how the war was fought and eventually some could say who came out on top when the war was over. This method of fighting or war tactic was called Blitzkrieg and Hitler used it for the first time against the Polish forces. Blitzkrieg is a method of warfare when the attacking force uses a dense concentration of armoured and motorised or mechanised infantry formations. Along with close air support the attacker then is able to break through the opponent's line of defence. The goal of Blitzkrieg is to use short, fast, powerful attacks to defeat the defenders, using speed and surprise. The use of this method during the invasion of Poland left a big impact on the rest of the war and changed the style of warfare that was used as opposed to trench warfare in the earlier World War . Even though the use of Blitzkrieg during the invasion of Poland did make an impact on the way the war was fought. The German invasion of Poland made many other impacts as well. The Polish people lived in a hellish state under German occupation. During that time every able bodied person from age 14 and up had to work ten hours a day six days a week. If they did not follow the German orders

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