Biblical Archaeology In The Bible

1654 Words 7 Pages
The biblical archaeology is concerned with the recovery and investigation of material remains of the past events, happenings and culture to illuminate the periods and descriptions in the Bible, especially from the Old Testament. An understanding of the Biblical archaeology requires knowledge of the Bible as the object of research. Many archaeologists have gained interest in uncovering the Bible happenings through various sources of evidence that they can find with relation to the Bible itself. Most of such archaeologists have formed arguments that the Bible stories are not historically correct but rather a presentation of traditional divergent ideologies. Finkelstein and Silberman in their book, the Bible unearthed have supported the idea that …show more content…
The Bible has a long history that has been explained in another version by the archaeologists. Archaeologists have questioned the accuracy of the Old Testament as an archaeological evidence of the past event. There is only a fraction of the evidence that is left on the ground and only a few sites have been discovered. One of those sites is The Code of Hammurabi which lies at the Louvre Museum. It contains the law of Babylonian king Hammurabi. Of the discovered sites, only a few have been excavated for evidence. This is due to the fact that modern cities have been constructed on top thus obscuring the evidence. Such cities include Haran, and Hazor .Concerning what has been excavated, only a little evidence has been examined and …show more content…
On the part of Egypt, it equally did not have much contact with the region at the time of David. However, the only existing evidence linked to Egypt is Sheshonq II’s inscription in Karnak. . His exploits are mainly mentioned in the book of Hebrew. The inscriptions also mention of the raid Sheshonq carried out in Judith other shortcoming of the archaeological evidence lies in the inability to locate evidence in Jerusalem, the capital city and the center of David’s power. As noted earlier, the existence of structures over these sites hampers this process. The official inscriptions by the medieval rulers such as Sheshonq had a tendency of being inscribed in temples, palaces and other official places. This is not much evident in Jerusalem because, since the 10th Century B.C, the city had undergone several changes, destructions and rebuilding’s (Finkelstein and Silberman

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