Baby Boomer Generation: The Millennial And Z Generations

881 Words 4 Pages
“Kids these days” is a term with a negative connotation that is commonly used among people from the Baby Boomer (1946 to 1964) and X (mid 1960s to early 1980s) generations when judging children on their hobbies and activities. According to them, the people of the Millennial (1980s to late 1990s) and Z (early 2000s and on) generations have much different childhoods and adulthoods than the previous two generations. In their eyes, children and young adults today are nothing like what they used to be in the past, and they are not wrong. In the 1980s, humans evolved into the Internet Generation due to the Digital Revolution, which was the mass production and widespread use of digital logic circuits, and its derived technologies, including the …show more content…
While all four generations use the Internet almost equivalently, twenty percent of the Millennial generation post videos of themselves online, whereas it is only two to six percent of the Baby Boomer and X generations. When it comes to social media, the Millennial and Z generations take a definitive lead, as expected. While only thirty percent of the Baby Boomer generation uses social networking sites, the percentage has more than doubled since the dawn of the Internet. As for cell phones, the pattern continues. Forty-one percent of the Millennial and Z generations own cell phones, whereas only twenty-four percent of the X generation and thirteen percent of the Baby Boomer generation own them.* When it comes to television and video games, the Millennial and Z generations play twice as many video games as the other two, but all four generations watch television equally. Nonetheless, it is evident that the two latter generations are far more inclined to use technology than the …show more content…
Within the last fifty years, the average intelligence of humans has greatly increased. This could be due to a variety of factors, such as the increase of technology, the amount of information people are able to access today, and the Flynn effect—the substantial and long-sustained increase in both fluid and crystallized intelligence test scores measured in many parts of the world from roughly 1930 to the present day. When it comes college education, fifty-four percent of Millennials, forty-nine percent of the X generation, and thirty-six percent of Baby Boomers have at least some college degree. The percentage differences exist due to the hardships that existed in the past, such as racism, sexism, and poverty. As there are more opportunities today than there were in the past, the number of people attending college will increase, as will the intelligence

Related Documents