Generation Z Vs Millennials Essay

Better Essays
Generation Z and Millennials both share similarities and differences in how each generation tends to speak. Millennials focus more on expressing their opinions and opening the floor to debate whereas Generation Z is more emotional- being told that his opinion is wrong is considered an infringement on his happiness. The Generation Zers tend to be extremely captious when it comes to choosing their words and manipulating them to their advantage so that they cannot be told otherwise; they care only about their opinion and do not care to listen to others. These nuances in speech affect interactions among individuals in both generations.

Both generations tend to be nitpicky and judgemental to others’ speech patterns and each has its own way of perceiving the same line. Millennials have placed much stress on differentiating how women and men speak and stating that ‘women's speech’ as inferior. Deborah Cameron touches upon this in her article “Just Don’t Do It” by underscoring how much more of society pays attention to men than women because of how women ‘hedge’ their words and utilize uptalk. Uptalking makes women seem unsure of their words, and therefore implies a lack of
…show more content…
While both generations agree on the weakness portrayed when women speak using words like “just”, they are evidently different when sharing their opinions and welcoming others into the discussion, or more often, debate. It is also true that the feeling based communication is not good for success, and all genders should use language which promotes logic and arguments. However, that does not mean that women need to emulate men and should abandon their polite and feminine traits in their communication. Similarly, a deferential or polite language used by women should not be construed as weak or

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    For example, some people may be willing to ignore an artist’ abusive background, while others may be unable to take this dispassionate approach. Thus, I think this issue rests with not whether a dispassionate approach can be taken when viewing confessional work, because it often depends on the specific individual, but with the harsher reality women face for their life choices compared to men, and society’s tendency to judge them more intensely. In Nell Bernstein’s "WHEN MEMOIR ISN 'T BY A HERO, IT 'S EASY TO KISS OFF,” she provides disgustingly negative reviews of Kathryn Harrison’s The Kiss, which was written about her intimate relationship with her father. Reviews judged her for accepting abuse and New York Times’ Maureen Down described Harrison’s The Kiss, as “creepy people talking about creepy people.” These reviews never stopped to evaluate Harrison’s confessional work or its artistic nature, and instead focused on her life choices and criticizing her character. It’s ironic that critics were unable to focus on the artistic value for Harrison’s work in a society where people excuse numerous male public figures questionable actions for their artistic contributions.…

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It is important not to partake in the Oppression Olympics because not only does it “divide and conquer” different oppressed groups, but it also detracts from the constructive conversations and issues that should be dealt with in regarding oppression of each group (162). Issues of gender include women playing roles as the runner ups by default because leadership positions are commonly overtaken by men. Women are also held at a double standard because they must assume masculine roles in order to be taken “seriously,” however face criticism and attacks at their character for being “bitchy” once they do so, or must not appear “too feminine” (164). Women’s behavior and appearance is often policed to be inferior, submissive, and compliant to the…

    • 1286 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Papa New Guinean Language

    • 1629 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The strong Sapir-Whorf hypothesis states that the culture in which you live shapes your thoughts and your frame of reference. Although this hypothesis has been refuted and a weaker one that allows for the individual to reciprocally shape the culture is widely accepted, I believe that the strong the Sapir-Whorf article has merit here Elder women in Gapun did not have equal access to education, and thus did not have the same opportunities to learn Tok Pisin, immediately casting them in a role as uneducated. The existing culture now also encourages women to defend their men by arguing with others. Men will tell their wife about a perceived slight so that they will express the anger. The culture perpetuates this view of women and forces them into the role, which doesn’t allow them to participate as leaders in the culture.…

    • 1629 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, the fact that they needed her to break through the gender roles and get a surprising reaction for what she did is showing women are generally weaker and less capable than men. Majority of the stories back then are of heroic men, which low key can mean women are not capable of what they are doing. This story stands out because it is a woman doing something men would typically do. So in the end, women are truly being treated as less in this story as well considering their own thoughts and others’ on…

    • 1051 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women can’t have it all! It turns out that neither can men despite what Slaughter would have you to believe. Both Slaughter and Dorment discuss the division of leadership in terms of gender, however, they have incredibly different beliefs on who or what is to blame for this apparent gap. Slaughter blames men and the systems that men have created while Dorment claims that a lack of drive and personal responsibility is limiting women to their current status. I personally side with Dorment’s argument on the issue, mostly due to the fact that Slaughter fails to be persuasive in her article due to the little evidence she provides being contradictory to other evidence presented by both Slaughter and Dorment.…

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A woman that adapts her style to a position of authority that she achieves or to which she aspires compromises herself as well as her message. When two people have the same ideas or opinions, it is commonplace for the male or masculine of the two to be chosen. This despite their expertise or knowledge on the subject. There is a clear appeal to seem more assertive to analysis and discuss an issue, but due to the lack of respect for the speaker it makes it a bigger struggle to drag across the message. This is not an issue for women, but the human race as a whole.…

    • 779 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Why Are Women So Inferior

    • 1735 Words
    • 7 Pages

    If anything, she is bothering him by wanting him to acknowledge her. He doesn’t care for her or her feelings, he is only concerned with keeping his image clean. Other reasons women are considered burdens are because they “self-doubt more than men since they aren’t raised to trust or stand up for themselves” (Halas, 6) and “have self-blame and guilt, causing them to be misunderstood and lessen their own self-acceptance” (Halas, 7). Both of these factors stated by Halas in her novel “Why Can’t A Woman Be More Like A Man?” are ones that make men frustrated with women usually, since they’re constantly having to encourage them, boost their self-esteem, or help them not be upset, and all these have to continually be repeated. Men sometimes depict their wives or women in general as helpless, or burdens, due to them needing much love and support.…

    • 1735 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Agentic Women Essay

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Leadership roles are most often seen as a male character occupation and therefore women are stereotyped upon for not being able to have the qualifications to do that job. This ultimately leads to that backlash effect in which it results in a woman not being able to be hired due to discrimination. Discrimination due to gendered stereotypes focuses on how perceived sex differences can prevent women from being viewed as leaders. In order to overcome this conflict, it would seem women have to act more like men. If women act like men, they are not liked because it violates gendered stereotypes of what women should act like.…

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women were forced to write in a man’s pen name so that they could get any sort of recognition. If a women were to submit a piece of work she would get a response like “You write? What’s the good of your writing?” Women were heavily criticized for writing and men would not take the time of day to teach women how to read or write. As you can see both Gailey and Woolf bring up the idea that men force women to conform to the way they want. Men came up with the excuse that women aren’t as intellectually advanced as men in the 16th century and in the 21st…

    • 1470 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These conversational habits are as frustration to men as they are to women. Men expect silent attention; however, when there are listener noises men perceive them as impatience or overreaction. Another difference among men and women is how they express support. Women have the tendency to agree to each other, while men tend to point out the other side of an argument Men’s conversational duty can be seen to women as disloyalty, and refusal to offer the requisite support (Tannen 284). Men take too literally women’s “trouble talk”, just as women mistake men’s challenges and real…

    • 709 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics