Australia Day Poem Analysis

Superior Essays
The 26th of January, Australia Day, what first comes to mind?
Depending on cultural ethnicity the answer to this question will be different. For those of white Australian background you think of the stereotypical lifestyle consisting of the sun, waves and mates. However for those of Indigenous background mass genocide and the beginning of the end for your culture is what is thought of on this day.
To display this stark contrast I have selected two poems by Australian poets which offer different opinions on the same day and what effect it has on White and Indigenous Australians. My first poem, Australia Day by Mick Colliss, who is a stereotypical Aussie, he loves his mates, AFL and beer, he describes the Australian lifestyle, the Australian
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People shape history, shape countries and are the crucial part to cultivating a sense of belonging within communities. The second poem is representative of how Indigenous Australians do not feel a sense of belonging due to the actions of the past that there is a deep separation between the two cultures. This poem highlights the issues of history, what is often forgotten. It utilises history, social and cultural points to make its effect on the audience. The use of onomatopoeia accentuates the word ‘Crack’ by incorporating this it makes the audience feel attacked and guarded, farthing the idea of a division. Chris P writes, highly contrastingly to Australia Day, ‘but he didn’t like me and my family’. This indicates to the audience that the European people were not accepting of the all people. He effectively utilises emotive language to create sense of sense of unrest, ‘we got a beating’. The nonchalance of this phrase conveys to the audience that beatings were not uncommon and something that was expected. The first poem gives a stark contrast to this as it is evident throughout the poem that the author loves Australia wholeheartedly are everything that the country has to offer. Whilst this poem is ignorant to the past it displays a deep sense of affection towards Australia and all her people. The final line of the poem is ‘But the people are the things about this place that I love most’ by ending on this it in captures the sense of belonging that the author feels, this is then translated to the audience, effectively ensuring that the mood of the poem is warming and sweet. He expresses his pride in his people, that he loves them above all else. Through the use of aesthetic features and language devices it enables the audience to grasp how the poet is feeling and what it trying to be conveyed about the people of

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