Malcolm X And Civil Rights Essay

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American society, over the course of time, has shown itself to be profoundly resistant to change. In order for real change to occur in this nation one of two things must occur; a viable benefit for those in power or a formidable threat. This is especially evidenced in cases of civil rights and the nation 's relationship with African Americans. As evidenced throughout American history, political and social change has only been allowed when it is advantageous to the nation 's leaders and/ or the economy. The emancipation proclamation, for instance, was not a result of President Lincoln’s abolitionist beliefs or moral compass, but a political strategy to win the civil war. This does not conclude that citizens of the United States are powerless …show more content…
Although some may view this as an extreme approach it is a direct response to the years of oppression that African- Americans were forced to undergo. The unjust system in which Black people had, and some may argue still have no rights proves that Malcolm X was not in any ways extreme. However, a direct result to the reality that he had knew and that his brothers and sisters knew. In order for there to be a just and equal society one must wake the attention of their oppressor by threats, violence, or whatever is deemed necessary for the situation. Malcolm X believe that “all of us [African- Americans] have suffered here, in this country, political oppression at the hands of the white man, economic exploitation at the hands of the white man, and social degradation at the hands of the white man” (Ballot or the Bullet). Malcolm X is convinced that because of theses actions White men have imposed on Blacks there is no reason for them to still act fairly and not go above and beyond to ensure they get the rights they deserved. In Malcolm X’s speech “The Ballot or the Bullet” he expresses how immigrants from Europe instantly become citizens, but Black people whom have been in the United States for many years are not. Malcolm X is calling his people to action to set aside their differences to come together for a greater cause. He wants them to do whatever it takes to gain the freedom they deserve. He preaches to not be afraid of the white man but instead to do what is necessary to receive the greatest outcome. Malcolm X expresses how often times White men use Black people for their votes or any type of gain but “when you [African- Americans] see them coming up with that kind of conspiracy, let them know your eyes are open… it’s got to be the ballot or the

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