Describe The Counseling Process

Great Essays
Description of Counseling Process
In person-centered therapy, there is a positive view of people and their capabilities of resolving issues on their own. (2) Therapy starts with the therapist questioning the client to understand the clients’ feelings, emotions, and experiences to discover the meaning behind what they are experiencing. The therapist is not interested in history of the problem nor in diagnosing the client. Instead, the therapist uses a nondirective approach and attitude that listens and allows the client to proceed as he or she would like. Once feelings and thoughts are expressed, they are explored through the clients’ own discovery. Although the client may hope for the therapist to provide “an answer”, the person-centered approach
…show more content…
The therapist does not spend lots of time listening to client history (5) Instead, emphasis is first on relationship building, organizing priorities, taking steps to identify the problem, and developing a treatment plan. Then efforts are focused on helping clients explore the connection between cognitions, emotions, and behaviors in order to aid in the desired approach to change (5). In REBT, clients are educated on how they are disturbed because their self-defeating beliefs and internal dialogue is related to their emotions and behavior. Therapists encourage clients to focus on the cognitive restructuring process which includes examining self-defeating statements and disturbed feelings and replacing them with effective beliefs, feelings, and behaviors so that they no longer believe the negative statements. Clients learn how to apply logical thought and perform behavioral homework as a way to bring about change. Therapy is primarily oriented toward cognition and behavior, and it stresses the role of thinking, deciding, questioning, doing, and redeciding. This approach emphasizes therapy as a learning process, including disputing beliefes, acquiring and practicing new skills, learning new ways of thinking, and acquiring more effective ways of coping with problems. Both REBT and person centered therapy emphasize here and now experiences and clients’ present …show more content…
Therapists strive to use techniques such as active listening, empathy, reflection of feelings, genuineness, empowering the client and focusing on the present. This model does not include diagnostic testing, interpretation, or taking a case history. By using this approach, the therapist and client develop a respectful, efficient relationship that allows opportunity for positive change for the

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Goals Of Narrative Therapy

    • 1237 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The therapist asked the client to organize the problem, and ask questions to attempt to dissolve the problem (page 386). The therapist and the client work together to construct new meanings to the client’s narrative. Interventions in SFT are problem-free talk. The therapist engages the client in a discussion that is unrelated to the reason why they came to therapy (Gehart, 2014). This intervention helps the client to explore the client’s strengths.…

    • 1237 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    370). The focus of the therapy is for the counselor to help a client understand his or her distorted beliefs and use techniques to help them change such maladaptive views (Sharf, 2012, p. 370). Overall, the focus converts into helping remove biases or distorted thinking clients have so that they may function more effectively (Sharf, 2012, p. 379). However, the reason why cognitive therapy is so appealing to me is because is based on creating a positive relationship with all clients. In cognitive therapy, the counselor works together with the client in order to help their change their maladaptive thinking patterns and behaviors that interfere with the client’s goal (Sharf, 2012l p.379).…

    • 748 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Narrative interventions are done through a series of questions. These questions are structured in the following way: externalizing conversations, relative influence questions, reauthoring, reinforcing the new story, and deconstructing destructive cultural assumptions. The series of questions develop the deconstructing of the old narrative and then help de-personify the problems. Then the therapist investigates the zones that the family was able to resist the problem so that they gain self-awareness that they have influence over the problem. After that, the therapist uses the questions to identify the unique outcomes so that a new narrative can begin to form.…

    • 2088 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    With rational emotive behavior therapy a client’s emotions and behaviors interact with the relationship they have and how those relationships work. A therapist may…

    • 1237 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    SAMHSA Substance Abuse

    • 1174 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Although, reflective listening (RL), can be viewed as non-directive counseling. Due to a counselor reflecting on their own instincts and recollection when rewording the conversation before repeat it to the client for understanding and confirmation (Gordon, 1970, p. 50). It can also possibly demonstrate as establishing a therapeutic response when reporting or engaging with their client’s. This can be considered a therapeutic working alliance which can be insubstantial (e.g., Glauser & Bozarth, 2001). Which permits the counselor to channel actively when determining the appropriate needs and best fit for the client.…

    • 1174 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Counseling Skills

    • 820 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Their interpersonal skills use these communication skills for acceptance, active listening, challenging the client, and congruence. Acceptance means taking another person exactly as they are. The counselor understands a person as a separate being that is entitled to their own feelings and experiences. This does not mean that the counselor is not entitled to their own beliefs, it just means that the client is believed to be all right inside. Active listening means using a special set of skills that encourage the person you are listening to talk.…

    • 820 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Client and Counselor Roles and Relationships: With adlerian theory, a client would be looking for to gain insight into their own behaviors or responses to situations that happen in their lives. Some of the main questions/concepts clients have to be ready face is how do they maintain their current lifestyle, why they resist changing it, and their private logic. Adlerian theory helps clients focus on their strengths, resources, and positive future oriented thoughts. In this theory, therapists need to be accepting of the clients and even help them accept/ correct their basic mistakes.Using comprehensive assessment of the client’s lifestyle, family constellation, and how they perceive the world, the therapist acts as a compass in the client's life, doing what is in the best interest of the client, rather than forcing them into a mold or shutting them down.Clients are not seen as “sick” by counselors in this theory but instead are seen as individuals who have been discouraged by the situations they experience. Another important aspect of this theory would be establishing and maintaining a cooperative therapeutic relationship with the…

    • 1082 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They are there to help the client explore their thoughts, and the reasoning behind those thoughts. Therapists should be teachers, they should teach the client how to change their cognitions and give them the tools that they need to be able to cope with situations on their own. Unlike psychotherapy, I do not think that the client should have to rely on the therapist, and there should not be a requirement for the client to see the therapist for a prolonged period of time. The therapist should also play the role of the investigator, trying to determine if any learned beliefs from the client’s past are causing current problems in their life. The therapist also has to be able to adapt to each client’s specific needs and must be empathic to create a warm and genuine environment.…

    • 1024 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    It is the therapist’s job to let the client know her or she are available, but they should not rush into recommending when they should start therapy. The client may have to talk for a bit, and get an idea of who the counsellor is, before deciding on seeing the counsellor for therapy. The therapist should clarify what therapy is, how it actually works, and answer some questions about what the patient can expect from the therapy session in general and from treatment with the assigned counsellor. Some of this is rudimentary procedures as required by the law, and some is quite basic informed consent measures as required by the ethical code. Nonetheless, this is also part of the process that forms the counsellor as a partner in the patient's therapy, and as an individual who is transparent and open about the…

    • 1108 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Motivational Interviewing

    • 553 Words
    • 3 Pages

    We chose motivational interviewing. Motivational Interviewing is an approach that works on promoting and engaging essential motivation within the client in order to change behavior. [citation needed] MI is a goal-oriented, client-centered counseling style for invoking behavior change by helping clients to explore and resolve ambivalence. In comparison with non-directive counseling, it's more focused and goal-directed. It goes away from traditional client-centered therapy through this use of direction, in which therapists attempt to influence clients to consider making changes, rather than non-directively explore themselves.…

    • 553 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays