Breed's Hill: The Battle Of Bunker Hill

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Battle of Bunker Hill

In 1775, the British and the colonists fought in Charlestown, Massachusetts. Both the British and and colonists set out to capture the unoccupied hills of Bunker Hill and Breed’s Hill. Although the name of the battle was “The Battle of Bunker Hill” the battle was actually fought on Breed’s Hill. The ultimate British goal of capturing Breed’s Hill and Bunker Hill was being able to occupy the hills that surrounded the city and also to control the Boston Harbor. Although it was considered the biggest battle in the Revolutionary War, the hype did live up to its potential and brought out the best of their abilities. In the end, the colonists were the true winners of this battle because of their fighting tactics, morale,
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Although the colonists were undermanned and were limited on supplies such as gunpowder, they still inflicted mass casualties upon this “superpower” at the time. Philbrick states, “The British victory failed to break the siege, and the gallant American defense heightened colonial morale and resistance” (138). This reinforced the ideas of Revolution because the British could not defeat the colonists defences along with the siege of Massachusetts. The British felt shellshocked by the fierce, scrappy fighting by the colonists which made the British question their future in the Revolutionary War. The colonists showed the British that they were a force to be reckon with, giving the colonists an upper hand in the mental aspect. Sara Ann McGill writes, “It showed the British that the colonists were more of a threat than they had previously believed. If Britain wanted to regain control of the colonies, it would face a long and difficult battle” (American History n. pag.). From this aspect, the British began to question how this might play out in the future. Realization became true to the British because they were barely able to handle the small-sized colonists militia and acknowledged that this rebellion was going to be harder to stop than they had imagined. The Battle of Bunker Hill further inspired and strengthened the mentality of the …show more content…
Once the Americans realized how heroically the militia had fought, they felt as if it was their patriotic duty to fight. The American people soon became confident in their abilities and grew to believe that they could win the Revolutionary War. Had the colonists been blown away by the British, the Revolution would have ended right there, and the faith in the American people would have been diminished leading to a small militia. Life for the colonists would have been disastrous, and the British would have achieved complete control over the Boston Harbor, for which the colonists had deep desires. Had the British conquered, they would have exercised severe oppression over the colonists. With their backs against the wall and all odds against them, they fought as if they were going to die at any second, ensuring more life for the Revolution. Although the colonists may have lost the battle, the war was not over. The colonists had the upper hand now, and it catapulted them into a full-blown Revolution. This battle proved to everyone in America that this cause was worth fighting for and led to a bigger picture. The critics had to decide whether they were for or against the militia, and eventually the militia was turned into a huge fighting force, making the American army bigger and stronger than ever before. American independence would soon be born. The

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