Transition To Democracy

México’s Transition to an Elusive Idea of Democracy A democracy is that which “its most powerful collective decision-makers are selected through fair, honest and periodic elections in which candidates clearly compete for votes and in which virtually all the adult population is eligible to vote”. It can be defined as political system in which individualistic power to make political decisions is based on a struggle for leadership votes and the freedom for people to make representation decisions concerning their rights”1. Democracy can ultimately be measured through political stability and free and fair elections to ensure equality in political representation within a nation. For the country of México democratization has been an unattainable …show more content…
His election would continue to “erode the stranglehold on electoral politics of PRI”. Although his presidency was a step toward democratization, it did not solidify or the transition. Despite his willingness to create reforms, much of the PRI members still controlled resources and held places in senate6. During his presidency he brought attention to the occurrence in Tlatelolco. On October 2, 1968 in Plaza de las Tres Culturas of Tlatelolco, Mexico City around 300 students as well as civilians were murdered by military and police due to protests of corrupt political leaders and failure of democracy. Fox released government records from Mexican Intelligence and Military about the events, exposing information about the deaths of the students. The students were protesting the rights that are frightfully theirs and being abused by corrupt leaders. It is those corrupt leaders than enabled such a violent suppression to the protests. The documents revealed state-sponsored violence between the 1960’s and 1980s. Vicente Fox advocated for judicial charges against those responsible. Fox’s presidency served as a move into the right direction for democratization by exposing the corruption of the authoritarian leaders that were unfairly elected by those in power. However, despite Fox’s presidency, violence and misrepresentation continued into the presidency of Enrique Peña …show more content…
Part of this is due to the “uneven subnational political change in Mexico”, this in turn would require that the perspectives of a political system be shaped so that those who inhabit it would be more willing to engage in these politics. Democracy seems less of a possibility for México as the people feel less inclined to participate in political elections and will have a tainted outlook of their political leaders and system due to knowledge of existing fraud9. Although it is essentially their right, as mentioned in their constitution, many of them do not exercise this right. In part, it is because the corruption is so evident that the people feel their vote is meaningless, and that ultimately political parties continue to hold all of the power. The attempt at a transition has slow, practically stagnant and violent. Protests for non-fraudulent elections for non-corrupt leaders that entails the basic rights of democracy were suppressed and ignored leaving the people helpless. The country of Mexico may consider itself a democracy but locally, it is evidently not. Ideally, political leaders should be those helping the country unify, but their corruption and inability to be accordance with a mutual goal of democratization has left them unable to unify the country. Corruption is heavily rooted in the government and has strongly affected the people and have left unrepresented and

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