The Mexican Revolution: The Rise Of Porfirio Diaz

Superior Essays
In the year of 1908, “60,000 to 100,000 Mexicans immigrated to the United States” due to a recession (Davenport 67). They left during the rule of Porfirio Díaz, who ruled Mexico as a dictatorship from 1876 to 1910. Taking control of a failing country, Díaz managed to improve the economy and infrastructure of Mexico, so some see him as a leader who transformed Mexico for the better. However, in order to make these improvements, Díaz had to exploit the lower class of Mexico and rig elections to ignore the two consecutive term limit so he could keep his power. Due to the poor conditions of the lower class and his blatant corruption, Mexico overthrew him in 1910 during the Mexican Revolution. Despite Díaz’ improvements to Mexico, his corruption …show more content…
He may have industrialized Mexico, but he did not solve the problems that came with industrialization. Laborers that were working in industrial factories had poor working conditions: low wages and no chance for promotion (Frost and Keegan 16-17). Also, workers in the haciendas, or plantations, were often illiterate, paid low wages, and had a one in four mortality rate (“The Restored Republic and Porfiriato”). Sometimes, the workers were not paid actual wages, but given credits for use in the company store (Frost and Keegan 20). Díaz hurt Mexico because he did not make any changes that would stop the squalor that the peasants were living in, even when other industrialized countries at the time had made reforms, such as labor unions, to help the working class, and those countries were successful. Even though these industries improved Mexico in terms of infrastructure, due to his failure to improve the conditions of low class, anger would build up in them due to their terrible state of living, and that resentment would lead to the uprising known as the Mexican Revolution, putting Mexico in a state of violence for years to come. Díaz would never address the issues with the working class, showing that he completely ignored them. Not only were the lower class of Mexico living in terrible conditions, but …show more content…
It seized land belonging to peasant villagers, and sold it to other companies, leaving the peasants homeless (Frost and Keegan 17-18). Workers were also forcefully collected by the military to work in the haciendas (Frost and Keegan 20). Anybody trying to organize any strikes or protest were forcefully stopped by the “rurales”, or police force (“The Restored Republic and Porfiriato”). Díaz knowingly allowed the lower class to be exploited in order to try and maintain his power by keeping the higher class of Mexico happy. Díaz was willing to leave the peasants without anywhere to live or farm, have them collected to be almost like slaves, and did not allow them to try and improve their working conditions. Díaz’ infringements of rights proved that he harmed Mexico. In order to justify these terrible acts, Díaz used “positivist ideals”, which is taking action to “benefit[...] some people at the expense of others” (“Porfirio Díaz”). Díaz thought that taking away the rights of the lower class was necessary in order to improve the lives of the upper class, but doing this led to the lower class taking part in the Mexican Revolution in 1910, which would, ironically, lower the power of the highest class. Díaz was against Mexico because the lower class were not recognized any rights during his reign. What the lower class had to suffer through prove that Díaz did not care about them, and their state of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Being a different skin color or just coming from another country during the Great Depression, just meant that jobs the opportunity available for you would be that much slimmer to obtain. Its as if history was repeating itself, like the time when African American slaves were freed, but were never freed to choose what they would want to work in, because the hardships of the white men would always be blame at the black men. Which is what happened during the great depression for many Mexicans, they were blame for why the Great Depression was happening. Also as Acuna puts it “the ugly head of racist nativism revealed itself” (216). Many Mexicans were deported back to their homeland, even if their children were born in America, it didn’t matter,…

    • 919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    According to Governor Pease “…our laws are adequate to the protection of life and property, but when citizens and authorities of a county become indifferent to their execution, they are useless” (Vargas 179). There was no justice even after the issues were brought up to those in power. Mexican Americans only had each other, since no one else was willing to open up to the idea of full equality. Mexican Americans were not treated with the respect and equality that the treaty mentioned. They had to fight for their own properties, worry about racist violence and the inequality when it came to the work force and the justice system.…

    • 709 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The land wars were in part due to the lack of resources caused by NAFTA, by killing of domestic industries and exporting those jobs elsewhere. Rather than distributing the gains and all profiting from this agreement, so free trade Huynh 2 and in particular NAFTA has drained the Mexican economy and left what remains to rot. Much like Holmes I find that the ideas and agreements based on free trade had only gone on to hurt Mexico’s economy and its citizens’ livelihood. Free Trade in North America now is practically unanimous with the North American Free Trade Agreement, now better known as NAFTA, its intended objective in the eyes of the United States and Mexico was to stem the flow of migrants from Mexico. This was to be achieved by allowing more businesses to open and hire locals.…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The article “Welfare and well-being in modern Mexico” by David Barkin discusses the Neoliberal structure of the Mexican government and how it creates a gap between the working classes. The privatization of companies forces the indigenous people to leave their peasant communities to live in Central Mexico under terrible conditions. Although Mexico appears to have a booming economy that is quickly growing on a global-scale, it is a superficial structure relying heavily on privately owned companies that rely on foreign exports. The heavy dependence of foreign investors and the exporting of natural resources leave Mexico vulnerable without a solid local market. This structure not only weakens their local economy, but as a result also makes it difficult to provide fair-wage jobs to their people.…

    • 762 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mexican Push Factors

    • 1155 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Displacing these people from the homes also made the value of the land increase (Beginnings 1848-1920, powerpoint). Diaz created this new political system that only benefitted the financially well-off people, his government, and himself (Henderson, pg 16). During this time period, the United States was in the process of upbringing more railroads and westernizing the country (Henderson, pg 16). Diaz similarly wanted a part in the modernization and industrialization after some time as well (Henderson, pg 15). “Mexico had only 416 miles of railroad track; when he [Diaz] left in 1911, Mexico had 15,360 miles of track, and the United States companies and United States capital had built some 70 percent of it” (Henderson, pg…

    • 1155 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    El Contrato Analysis

    • 1297 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The use of pesticide and chemicals was a common task in the hands of the Mexican farm workers. Rather than thinking of the task as a request, it was more of a command towards the migrant workers. This further portrays the lack of equality and rights towards them as the law suggests “one has the right to be trained to deal with workplace hazards … and to say no if the task is too demanding” (“Workplace Rights”, 2017) however was absent in their lives. As seen in the documentary El Contrato, there were many migrant workers that would end up with severe cases of injuries to their hands and eyes because of the lack of training (Lee, 2003).…

    • 1297 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Andrew also felt this system benefited the northern industry more than the southern farmers. Jackson began to do this by starving the bank by moving millions of dollars from the bank to the individual state banks. When Henry Clay accelerated the deadline of the bank’s charter’s renewal, Jackson vetoed it. The effects of this were widespread; America later fell into a depression that lasted six years. Much of this was rooted in that banks lost trust without gold backing in the currency.…

    • 852 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In reference to factory workers’ poverty as aforementioned, part of the reason for their destitute lifestyle was because of Tweed and other “bosses.” Politicians promised to hear the concerns of the poor and even gave handouts, which compelled the poor to vote for those politicians. Once said politicians entered office, the assistance halted and reimbursement was demanded, thus the workers were left more vulnerable than ever. Although, acts such as the Sherman Antitrust and Purchase Act, which were designed to help the average worker escape poverty, they took far too long to listen to the people’s pleas. However, some achievement did owe itself to the government. Some money may have been used for a corrupt politician’s own gain, but the rest was invested into innovations.…

    • 910 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Mexico before Diaz was the post-independence period consisting of infighting among the centralists and regionalist, soon after between the liberal and the conservatives. The country was in constant state of what seemed to be political anarchy. The constant infighting creating civil conflict naturally weakened the nation essentially allow the United States to encroach in 1846 resulting in more than half of Mexico’s national land to be lost to them. Not long after the liberal reform came to rise, led by Benito Juarez, was there some stability among the nation. Not long after the liberal enacted radical social reforms creating unrest allowing the intervention by the French under Napoleon III in 1863, placing a surprisingly liberal Emperor from the Habsburg line, Maximillian, who was overthrown and executed by Juarez another example of the instability within the Mexican political system.…

    • 1000 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    A very familiar theme continues to hover over Mexico specifically when it refers to the economic woes the political system continues to mismanage. Politicians that simply run for office to help themselves, while screwing the Mexican over time and time again. It is a behavior that has been in place since the Spanish conquistadors took over, by introducing new policies that benefited the white European while physically, morally, economically, and culturally destroying all social progress for the indigenous Mexican. Mexico has always been rich in natural resources, landmarks and culture, but it has always struggled to maintain an economic system where... and once more Mexico found oil, one of its richest sources that could potentially gear…

    • 1451 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays