Analysis Of Homeschooling: A Personal Decision By Karen White

1982 Words 8 Pages
In “Homeschooling: A Personal Decision,” Karen White, journalist, presents an article in favor of home-schooling when students need for time for extra-curricular activities. Home-schooled children can be instructed by parents or other educators. Extra-curricular activities such as ballet require large amounts of practice time and home-schooling can provide a way to spend more time on these activities. While she persuasively argued that homeschooling allows ballet students to devote more time to dance, White’s claim was not effective in offering evidence that it offers a quality education. White’s article is in favor of home-schooling when students need for time for extra-curricular activities, specifically ballet. Considering that ballet …show more content…
She offers opinions such as how homeschooling is “the same as regular school, except it’s just me and the teacher” (72). This implies that all homeschool programs are the same, as well as the impression that homeschooling is just like regular school. White does not offer any opinions or quotes from ballet students who prefer a traditional school setting over homeschooling, which is meant to give the idea that homeschooling is the best option and most all ballet students choose this path. In these ways, White stacks the deck and encourages readers to jump on the bandwagon. When statistics evidence is offered, such as the percentage of children in the U.S. that are homeschooled, it does not relate directly to her original thought about how homeschooling can provide extra time for ballet or dance (77) and seems to be intended to mislead and place the focus of the argument elsewhere. For the most part, other than implying that all the ballet students are being homeschooled, White tends to stay away from using fallacies in order to persuade the reader that homeschooling is the best …show more content…
She acknowledges that homeschooling is “controversial and not supported by many traditional educator” (42), as well as admitting that there is little research that proves whether it is a sufficient education. She also says that even though homeschooling may provide flexibility in order to have more time for dance classes, it does not guarantee a ballet career. White also includes the opinion of Dante, who believes that dancers should attend the local public school system and that she wishes her students to have a somewhat normal life. She also is concerned that ballet students will be “in an incubator in which their entire careers are centered around ballet” (78). While White is offering another option besides homeschooling, she is basically just saying that public school is the only other option. For as short as her article is, White did attempt to show another point of view or present other

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