Maria Zadie Smith Biography

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Not necessarily, I do maintain any order of my reading, neither do I control. There isn’t a clue what factor dominates the list of my readings! Lately, my fiction reading narrowed in a specific area, obviously the criteria of selections indicate my recent reading focal point. It’s Bengali Diaspora literature, not the whole, but a major portion of the chunk, which is available in the open market.
I remember the instigation of this diasporas reading. It is Zadie Smith, who I consider the pioneer of the Bengali Diaspora literature! Yes, I know it 's an unreasonable approach, considering someone the pioneer, who isn 't a Bengali, rather a British, (I decided not to go for her any other background) who overrode this specific notion, her inclusion
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Maria’s piece is an autobiographical, the writing’s sum-up reflects the comprehensive fiction elements. The descriptive method she followed, seems to me as nothing but an extensive fiction. I also came across one of her conversation and a QA session from Hong Kong that gave me more in depth idea about her, who she is as a writer.
Maria Chaudhuri’s background and grown up history is nowhere close to Abeer or Tanwi Islam in real life. She grew up in Dhaka, as I stated before that in a well off family, blended with Desi plus Islamic and westernized leaned cultural trend type society (this is the sense I got about her from the book ‘Beloved Stranger’). Not essentially I believe that had to do anything to construct her intellectual universe. I conclude, she is an individual who by instinct significantly a gifted.
A methodical advancing of her approach in her book provokes to distinguish how a Bengali women writer from Bangladesh untie the rap of conservative dungeons’. She broke the wall and then she desperately endured the open path that is directed to a great writers’

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