Alexander Hamilton And The Federalist Party

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“Alexander Hamilton, a political tyrant of the 1790s, gave Thomas Jefferson no other recourse but to form his own political party to oppose the Federalist Party’s repressive policies.” This historian’s interpretation of Alexander Hamilton and the Federalist Party is biased and not factual. Hamilton was not a political “tyrant.” However, he was a strong-willed and obstinate individual. In addition, the Federalist Party did not have “repressive” policies. Alexander Hamilton and the Federalist Party played a key role in constructing the United States of America by promoting industrialization, foreign relationships, and creating a government for the well being of the nation. Alexander Hamilton was a brilliant man. He was one of the seven Founding …show more content…
He opposed Hamilton and the Federalist’s viewpoints. Jefferson, along with the Jefferson Republicans, stood for states’ rights rather than a strong central government and they had a strict view of the Constitution, instead of a loose view. They wanted the United States to transform back to its roots, both economically and politically instead of blossoming into something greater. The Jeffersonian Republicans consisted mainly of Southern small farm owners, small businessmen, and the common men. The Jeffersonian Republicans supported the idea of agriculture, and believed that it should be the base of the economy. Jeffersonian Republicans also despised the idea of a national bank. They believed that “Congress had no constitutional right to charter a bank, and that allowing Congress to do so would revive the popular fears of centralized despotism” (Murrin, 243). The national bank would also take away rights that Jefferson believed to belong to the state rather than the national …show more content…
In 1798, the Federalist Congress passed the Acts and president of the United States, John Adams, signed them into law. During this time, a war with France was a near possibility, and this was a way to make sure that peace and stability was kept in the United States. The Alien Act allowed the president to remove any alien from the United States if they were considered dangerous. In addition, the Naturalization Act extended the amount of time it took for alien residencies to become a United States citizen from five years to fourteen years. Under the Sedition Act, Adams had the authority to shut down any newspaper that printed false or scandalous stories. Many citizens viewed that the Sedition Act took away the First Amendment rights. These Acts resulted in a loss of support for the Federalists and contributed to Thomas Jefferson being the winning candidate in the 1800 presidential

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