Ain T I A Women Analysis

Decent Essays
Many years way before the Woman Suffrage Movement, woman weren’t considered as equal as men we were downgraded. The historical poem & document I chose are when women's rights movement was taking place. The woman suffrage movement began to gather strength In the 1840’s as woman began to fight for equal rights, the woman suffrage movement opened opportunities for women. The poem that I chose talks about women's equality it is called ‘’Ain’t I a women’’. The passage ‘’Ain't I a women’’ it describes demand equal quality and are tired of looking down upon as all women deserve equal rights just as anyone else, and the right to vote. The historical document ‘’Ain’t I a women?’’ by Sojourner which was also took place in the 19th century explains and shows that black women were also treated very different because black women were enslaved and didn’t have the same rights as white woman such as they could have their kids taken away or even not go to school but every woman no matter what race had to fight to be treated equal. Woman had to fight and fight for their equality In the speech I am a woman Sojourner she states ‘’That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could …show more content…
Soon after women began fighting for their rights realizing that they were good enough, and they were right the 19th amendment was approved and woman were finally treated equal giving them the rights they

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